Iran Protests: IRI Islamic Regime Got to Go!

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Re: Iran Protests: IRI Islamic Regime Got to Go!

Postby Surenareal » Fri May 25, 2018 8:40 am

Why European Countries such as; UK, Germany, France, and Russia, Shamelessly Support Mullahs' Illegitimate Regime that has the Highest Number of Execution Per-Capita in the World?

These European countries having gradually lost most of their global markets to China and Chinese products would soon be bankrupt, if it were not for plundering Iran, and other countries in the region, by their Montage Industries in Iran of old-model cars, and their other old leftover products sold in Iran.

These European countries are using Neocolonial Contracts of up to 35-years duration, on Crude Oil exploitation of Iranian oil fields with what they consider as their Neocolonial Protectorate of Mullahs' Regime. Very long-term contracts of 80% for themselves and 20% for the Mullahs’ Illegitimate Regime occupying Iran toady.

In reality, Germany, France, UK, and Russia are treating Iran as their Milking Cow.

Only the United States of America can put an end to this exploitation of Iranian Nation's Wealth and Natural Resources by the EU and stop the plunder of Iran by these immoral and opportunist European countries that use their Puppet Mullahs' Illegitimate Regime as a Neocolonial Protectorate.
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PS: What are the Top-Secret Facts About Mullahs' Illegitimate Regime Occupying Iran today?

1 - That mullahs' illegitimate regime was put in power in Iran on February 11, 1979 by a well-planned and organized foreign powers' plot, this was no revolution at all but a coup d’état. (This plot was finalized in Guadeloupe Summit, from 4 to 7 January 1979, by the leaders of foreign powers UK, US, France, Germany, Italy, and Canada, that were the puppeteers of then traitor Mullah Khomeini, and now of traitor Mullah Khamenei).

2 - That mullahs' illegitimate criminal regime occupying Iran today is not independent, it is a dependent Neocolonial Protectorate (hokoomat-e mos ta mareh navin, va tah tol hemaa yeh, dast ne shan deh ajnabi) of foreign powers and a puppet regime, subservient to their puppeteers, the European countries such as; UK, France, Germany, Russia and the International Crude Oil Consortium.

3 - That traitor regime's mullahs in power in Iran are all foreign puppets, (dalghak- e ajnabi) despot tyrant criminal mullah Ali Khamenei (vatan foroosh- e khaaen beh Iran va Irani, dal ghak-e ajnabi}, can be seen with his foreign masters' orders on pieces of paper in his left hand, he, and his mafia cliques, receive their daily orders from their foreign masters and puppeteers.

Recent Additional Information From # Rooh-e Shytaan" by Irandokht, of 3 June 2018.

Medieval Traitor Mullah Ruhollah Khomeini-e Maloon was born in Jalandhar, Punjab, India; around 1902, died (beh darak vaasel shod) on 3 June 1989. He was a British-Indian Secret Agent who was installed to power in Iran by the CIA & MI6 plot of 11 February 1979, and took his orders from the British and US Governments of the time.

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"Once a traitor always a traitor", Jaffar Shafiezadeh in one of his confessions, the 60 part audios posted above, mentions that;

Just before 11 February 1979 plot in Iran, when two Kill-Lists of more than 5000 patriotic Iranians were prepared by major powers, those to be killed within 10 days from the coup of 1979, "copies of those Kill-lists were given to Ardashir Zahedi and he took them with him to Tehran at that time".

Now it is clear that it was him the present time Salman-e Parsi, a traitor to Iran and Iranians Ardashir Zahedi. Of course he is not the only one who worked for the Oil Consortium and other foreign powers' masters of the mullahs' illegitimate criminal regime.

There are many others who still use daily brainwashing insidious propaganda to save mullahs' illegitimate criminal regime, and get paid a lot for it, such as: A.R. Noorizadeh, J. Chalangi, B. Farhoodi, and F. Dadrass.

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Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen

Articles:

1. Men are born and remain free and equal in rights. Social distinctions may be based only on common utility.

2. The purpose of all political association is the preservation of the natural and imprescriptible rights of man. These rights are liberty, property, security, and resistance to oppression.

3. The principle of all sovereignty rests essentially in the nation. No body and no individual may exercise authority which does not emanate expressly from the nation.

4. Liberty consists in the ability to do whatever does not harm another; hence the exercise of the natural rights of each man has no other limits than those which assure to other members of society the enjoyment of the same rights. These limits can only be determined by the law.

5. The law only has the right to prohibit those actions which are injurious to society. No hindrance should be put in the way of anything not prohibited by the law, nor may any one be forced to do what the law does not require.

6. The law is the expression of the general will. All citizens have the right to take part, in person or by their representatives, in its formation. It must be the same for everyone whether it protects or penalizes. All citizens being equal in its eyes are equally admissible to all public dignities, offices, and employments, according to their ability, and with no other distinction than that of their virtues and talents.

7. No man may be indicted, arrested, or detained except in cases determined by the law and according to the forms which it has prescribed. Those who seek, expedite, execute, or cause to be executed arbitrary orders should be punished; but citizens summoned or seized by virtue of the law should obey instantly, and render themselves guilty by resistance.

8. Only strictly and obviously necessary punishments may be established by the law, and no one may be punished except by virtue of a law established and promulgated before the time of the offense, and legally applied.

9. Every man being presumed innocent until judged guilty, if it is deemed indispensable to arrest him, all rigor unnecessary to securing his person should be severely repressed by the law.

10. No one should be disturbed for his opinions, even in religion, provided that their manifestation does not trouble public order as established by law.

11. The free communication of thoughts and opinions is one of the most precious of the rights of man. Every citizen may therefore speak, write, and print freely, if he accepts his own responsibility for any abuse of this liberty in the cases set by the law.

12. The safeguard of the rights of man and the citizen requires public powers. These powers are therefore instituted for the advantage of all, and not for the private benefit of those to whom they are entrusted.

13. For maintenance of public authority and for expenses of administration, common taxation is indispensable. It should be apportioned equally among all the citizens according to their capacity to pay.

14. All citizens have the right, by themselves or through their representatives, to have demonstrated to them the necessity of public taxes, to consent to them freely, to follow the use made of the proceeds, and to determine the means of apportionment, assessment, and collection, and the duration of them.

15. Society has the right to hold accountable every public agent of the administration.

16. Any society in which the guarantee of rights is not assured or the separation of powers not settled has no constitution.

17. Property being an inviolable and sacred right, no one may be deprived of it except when public necessity, certified by law, obviously requires it, and on the condition of a just compensation in advance.
Last edited by Surenareal on Tue Jun 26, 2018 5:15 pm, edited 55 times in total.
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Iranian Protests for Naser Malek Motiei Pass-away

Postby Atusa Qajar » Mon May 28, 2018 6:54 pm

Iranian Protests for Naser Malek Motiei Pass-away
People found excuse to protest

Regime’s Thugs and Basij Disrupt Funeral
After 40 years of ban, Regime unbanned him after his death

Naser Malek Motiei, Great Persian Actor Passed Away
Legendary Persian Actor, Director and Cinematographer Passed Away


After the death of Naser Malek Motiei, a star of prerevolution Iranian cinema, thousands of people demonstrated in Tehran to honor his memory -- and to condemn the government for banning him from the screen. Regime Thugs tried to disrupt the funeral but crashed with people who were determined to mourn and protest.

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Manoochehr Vosoogh, Foroozan and Naser Malek Motiei

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Naser Malek Motiei with Fardin

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Naser Malek Motiei

Site

Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naser_Malek_Motiei

IMDB
https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0539339/

Video

Film Star's Death Sparks Iranian Protests
https://www.rferl.org/a/iran-cinema-act ... 55402.html

Naser Malek Motiei Talks and Memories
https://youtu.be/micsT8DMm7E

Naser Malek Motiei Memories
https://youtu.be/eSxzWJaTzzE

Naser Malek Motiei Interview
https://youtu.be/poOaNPL1eE8

Art Interview
https://youtu.be/dIUm3SH5We4

Talk with Behruz Vosoughi
https://youtu.be/mGAn3r-oO-4

Agha Mehdi Comes In Movie
https://youtu.be/YS2AjJEmEH8

Funeral Protests

Our State Media Is Our Shame
https://youtu.be/v16hXilD4Dc

Protests
https://youtu.be/7l7tKy0bfPk

More
https://youtu.be/vgYOfm716bU

Regime Forces Disrupt Funeral Of Beloved Iranian Actor Naser Malek Motiei
https://youtu.be/p30vvP6tih4

Death Finally Ends Media Ban On 'King Of Iranian Cinema'

RFE
https://www.rferl.org/

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For decades, prominent Iranian actor and director Nasser Malek Motiee was forbidden from working and faced a strict media ban.

Celebrated Iranian actor and director Nasser Malek Motiee was under a media ban for nearly 40 years, and it wasn't lifted until he was 6 feet under.

But after he died on May 26 at the age of 88, the man known as the "King of Iranian cinema" finally found himself back in the spotlight.

Malek Motiee's funeral in Tehran the next day drew thousands of fans -- some taking the opportunity to chant antigovernment slogans, prompting a heavy-handed police response -- and dominated the front pages of many Iranian newspapers.

Malek Motiee starred in and directed dozens of films prior to the Islamic Revolution in 1979. Afterward, the state broadcaster, the Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting (IRIB), and the ruling establishment imposed a media ban on prerevolutionary celebrities.

With few exceptions, Malek Motiee was also barred from acting and directing any films in Iran due to strict restrictions placed on the movie industry after the revolution.

Highlighting The Irony

"The End Of The Media Ban," the reformist Aftab-e Yazd newspaper wrote in a May 27 editorial that highlighted the irony of state media’s coverage of Malek Motiee's death.

"The news of his death was announced by state TV, though his presence on TV was restricted before that," the daily added.

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Nasser Malek Motiei's funeral drew thousands of fans.

"Farewell To The Great King Of Iranian Cinema," a headline in the financial daily Donya-ye Eqtesad read.

The front page of the reformist Hamdeli daily was dominated by a photo of the late actor’s body being laid to rest. In another reference to Malek Motiee being ostracized by the government, the headline read: "Naser! The People Came.”

The hard-line daily Kayhan was an exception: Malek Motiee did not make the front page, which was dominated by a photo of mourners having iftar -- the fast-breaking dinner gatherings during Ramadan -- at a cemetery for martyrs in Tehran.

'Our Disgrace, Our State Broadcaster'

During Malek Motiee’s funeral service, some mourners chanted antigovernment slogans, including: "Our disgrace, the state broadcaster" and, "Our disgrace, the law enforcement.”

Videos posted on social media purported to show police using tear gas to disperse the mourners who were protesting. RFE/RL could not verify the authenticity of the videos.

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Malek Motiee starred in and directed dozens of films prior to the Islamic Revolution in 1979.

Human Rights In Iran, a Canada-based nongovernmental organization, uploaded a video to Twitter on May 27 that purported to show people covering their mouths with their hands and coughing. The caption reads: “Police used tear gas against people during the funeral of Naser Malek Motiee. A number of people were arrested by police.”

In an interview with Iran's semiofficial Fars news agency, Tehran’s deputy police commander, Hamid Hodavand, confirmed that police had countered "opportunists" whom he claimed sought to disrupt the funeral ceremony.

Earlier on May 27, a spokesman for Iran’s powerful Judiciary warned that Iranian security forces would "resolutely confront" unrest that could be exploited by the United States and other enemies.

"I urge families not to let their children be fooled by psychological warfare...launched by the enemy, especially Zionists (Israel) and Americans, and not let counterrevolutionaries infiltrate crowds of protesters who have legitimate demands,” said Gholamhossein Mohseni Ejei, the Judiciary's news website, Mizanonline, reported.

Addressing the state broadcaster during the funeral ceremony, Malek Motiee's son condemned the media ban on his father.

In a widely viewed video uploaded on May 27, he asks: "Why are my father's photos shown on news channels now? Why are photos of an actor only allowed after his death?"

Parviz Parastui, a prominent Iranian actor, also addressed mourners and strongly criticized IRIB for the media ban on Malek Motiee.

"For 40 years, we couldn't say his name," he said to applause. "We feared it. But we shouldn't have feared it. He never committed a crime."

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Iran is Crippled by Strikes, Protests & Sanctions

Postby Atusa Qajar » Fri Jun 01, 2018 5:25 pm

Iran is Crippled by Strikes, Protests & Sanctions

Trump Sanctions Cripples Iran’s Economy
2nd Week of Truck Drivers Nationwide Strike Collapses Iran’s Economy


Pro Trump Sanctions Wall Graffiti in Streets of Tehran:
“Trump Damet Garm”
(Trump We Support You)

Total Pressure on IRI Islamist Regime is Working
Iranian People Support Trump Sanctions


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Iran Gripped by Strikes and Protests
Jubin Afshar

Open Democracy
https://www.opendemocracy.net/

The triangle of domestic uprising, regional readiness to confront an expansionist regime, and a growing international willingness to take on Tehran, at least by the United States, is creating conducive circumstances for change.

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ScreenShot. Video source. YouTube. Woman trucker calls on fellow truckers to remain united.

As the truckers’ strike in Iran enters its tenth consecutive day, despite concerted efforts by authorities to break and suppress it, and the many sacrifices that strikers and protesters are making, there is a sense of change and people power in the air.

The ongoing protests since the tail end of 2017, of which the strikes are a continuation, have led the Iranian people to again believe in their own power to confront a highly oppressive regime on their own terms.

The strike is unprecedented in its scope and strength of unity. Though this is not the first trucker strike in recent years – the largest was limited to just four cities in March of 2016 – none have reached the extensive and broad reach of this one. The current strike has spread to over 249 cities in all of Iran’s 31 provinces. Footage of striking truckers resisting security forces, encouraging unity, admonishing strikebreakers, parading empty loads on the nation’s highways, has spiked on social media networks such as Twitter, Telegram, and other platforms.

In a video posted on social media, a woman trucker calls on fellow drivers to remain united in the face of the authorities half-hearted attempts to win over segments of the truckers and says she and scores of other truckers are moving their trucks along the road to Qazvin with empty loads in protest and calls on others to join them. Iran’s parliament speaker, Ali Larijani, signaled on Wednesday that Iran’s National Security Council is looking at the truckers’ strike, indicating that they view the issue as one of national security, a harbinger for more suppression. However, strikers have thwarted all attempts at forcing them back onto the roads until now. The government’s only recourse to addressing the strikers’ grievances is to meet their demands for higher wages, something it cannot do at the same time as it is funneling billions of dollars into influencing outcomes in the Syrian war, the Iraqi political process, Yemen’s civil war, and incitement in the Palestinian-Israeli conflict.

US withdrawal from the Iran nuclear accord (JCPOA) and the kicking in of US sanctions will further force Iran to face up to its internal contradictions, expediting the socio-political process of change in Iran. Lacking the slush fund provided to it by the JCPOA and foreign business investments, Iran will have to make hard choices. Protesters earlier this year chanted: “Leave Syria alone, think about us” as they admonished the regime for wasting resources for domestic development on warmongering adventurism in the region. The slogan pits ordinary Iranians against a government that is increasingly isolated. So much so that recent sanctions on the regime garnered “Way to go Trump!” graffiti in Tehran, however surprising that may seem.

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The strike has also gained significant international attention. The US based International Brotherhood of Teamsters (IBT) issued a tweet in its official account declaring, “Teamsters Stand in Solidarity with Iran Truck Drivers Strike.”

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A prominent Iranian blogger, Heshmat Alavi, has reported taxi drivers striking in solidarity in Urmia, Qaemiyeh, Sanandaj, and posted video of the striking taxis. Footage from Tehran’s main loading terminal on Tuesday shows workers there protesting during a complete work stoppage. Video from the normally bustling Persian Gulf port of Bushehr on day 9 of the strike show the port totally deserted and rows of trucks parked idly on strike.

The truth about Iran is that it is a rigid theocracy nurturing a crony capitalist system where the IRGC and supreme leader’s favourites rule the economy. The vast youthful population languishes with college degrees and no jobs. Women are systematically suppressed as second-class citizens, though they fight back in all ways possible. The government’s interference extends to people’s private lives, homes, whom they associate with on the streets, what they wear, the music they prefer, political ideas they espouse, and their way of life. There is no “freedom” in Iran and Iranians know it. Until recently, they have resisted the regime’s encroachments in little ways, but now they sense its weakness, and an unprecedented opening.

For things to change in Iran, the stars need to align properly: domestic factors and international factors need to favorably affect change. The staying power of Iran’s theocratic regime in the past 40 years has not been for lack of popular opposition to the theocracy, but for lack of a favorable alignment of domestic and international factors affecting Iran. When the people of Qazvin or Mashhad rose in the 1990’s, or when the uprising of 1999, and then 2009 took place, the regime’s brutal suppression was met with international complacency.

World governments from Europe, UK, to the US showed an impatience with the masses who were making things difficult for better relations with Iran, and for foreign corporations wanting to do business in Iran, and an Obama administration that wanted a nuclear deal with them. The uprising of 2018 however, is unfolding against a different international political landscape. Regional Arab countries have set aside their conservative stance to challenge Iran’s adventurism and interventions in the region, and most importantly, a new US administration has taken a completely new line with Iran, distinguishing between the ruling regime and the Iranian people.

The triangle of domestic uprising, regional readiness to confront an expansionist regime, and a growing international willingness to exact a price on Tehran for its malign behavior, at least by the United States, is creating conducive circumstances for change in Iran.

The truckers, workers, taxi and bus drivers, youth, and women in Iran, all sense change in the air. Forty-two years ago, when Jimmy Carter toasted the Shah of Iran and said “Iran is an island of stability in a troubled region of the world,” no one foresaw the implosion of the Shah’s regime about a year later. Now too, we should be aware that Iran is in the throes of yet another convulsion. This one is set to upend the Middle East. Perhaps this time for the better. There are many reasons for optimism, but most significant is Iran’s own people, who have been inoculated against one of the most virulent strains of intolerance and fanaticism, forming one of the most outwardly friendly nations to progressive change in the region today.

Video

Iranian Woman Truck Driver Calls Truck Drivers to Strike
Truck Drivers of Iran on Strike
https://youtu.be/8sdGDB1LyOc

Nationwide strikes by Iran’s truck drivers: what you need to know
https://youtu.be/ibu_GKFetPg

Regime Reporter Brazenly Threatens Iranian Truck Drivers Who Are On Strike
https://youtu.be/Yz9WH_YFats

Protesting truck drivers blocked the main highway from Tehran to Kerman
YAZD, Iran, May 23, 2018
https://youtu.be/QCa7OvrHwVM

Nationwide Strike By Truck Drivers In Iran Continues On Seventh Consecutive Day
https://youtu.be/naCKdxhWvNo

More Strikes and Protests

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Iranian Women Hejab Protests & Social Unrest Continues

Postby Atusa Qajar » Sun Jun 17, 2018 9:35 am

Iranian Women Hejab Protests & Social Unrest Continues

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Iranian Woman protesting hejab

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Iranian Woman protesting hejab

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Risking jail: Shaparak Shajarizadeh, who was arrested for hejab ban

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Hejab protest

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Iranian Women singing women protest song in Tehran Metro
International Women’s Day


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Iranian Women singing women protest song in Tehran Metro
International Women’s Day


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Singing protest song then at 1979

Video

Women take off hijab in Tehran Subway
Iranian Women singing women protest song in Tehran Metro
International Women’s Day

https://youtu.be/rf00JTDpDE8

Woman kicks morality police In Stomach
who try to make her wear hijab in Iran

https://youtu.be/5JvIkaCN3tc

Brave Iranian woman defies hijab walks the street without hijab
https://youtu.be/fOB-XKL_zZY

Iran Arrests 29 Women for Removing Hijabs
https://youtu.be/0aZW66oDGHc

Women Risked Imprisonment in Iran to Protest the Compulsory Hijab
https://youtu.be/PPA4BmkjJME

March 8, 1979 Iranian Women March Against Hijab and Islamic Laws
https://youtu.be/pxGYLk92edY

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Protest Wherever You Want, as Long as Iranian Authorities Choose the Place
Frud Bezhan

RFE
https://www.rferl.org/

A spate of violent antigovernment demonstrations has rocked Iran in recent months, challenging the clerical establishment that has forbidden public dissent and has a history of cracking down harshly on unauthorized protests.

Iranian citizens have demanded that their constitutional right to hold peaceful demonstrations be upheld, after tens of thousands of Iranians marched in scores of cities and towns across the Islamic republic in December and January. The authorities crushed those protests, leaving at least 25 dead.

In a move intended to placate protesters, the government on June 11 approved a proposal by the Tehran City Council to designate 12 specific locations where authorized protests can be held in the capital. The initiative, however, is widely seen as an attempt by the government to control such protests.

The protest zones in Tehran include the Shiroudi, Dastjerdi, Takhti, Motamedi, and Azadi sports stadiums; the Goftegoo, Taleqani, Velayat, Pardisan, Honarmandan, and Shahr public parks; and an area near the parliament building in the capital's Baharestan neighborhood, according to Iran's semiofficial ISNA news agency.

The government said it was working with city councils across Iran to designate protest zones.

Article 27 of the country's constitution stipulates that citizens have the right to hold assemblies, "provided arms are not carried" and that the assemblies "are not detrimental to the fundamental principles of Islam."

But in practice, it is almost impossible to obtain permits for protest gatherings or rallies, with authorities imposing complicated requirements.

Based on the Interior Ministry's regulations, whoever wants to hold an assembly must present the list of people responsible for its security and disciplinary aspects, as well as the exact time of the gathering, long before the date of the event.

The hard-line conservative daily Kayhan criticized the initiative in a front-page editorial on June 12 that said "the government's responsibility is to solve people's problems, not designate spots for gatherings."

"Is the government aware of people's problems? If they solved them, there would be no need for public gatherings," Kayhan added.

The reformist daily Etemad on June 12 published on its front page a map of Tehran showing the approved protest zones and said they were necessary to avoid violence and disruption to residents.

"The unrest in late January and the widespread popular demands throughout the country during recent months have led to a decision to facilitate the holding of protest gatherings, while emphasizing the recognition of people's right to protest," Etemad said in an editorial.

Since December, Iranians have staged dozens of marches and demonstrations in cities and towns across the Islamic republic, protesting against rising unemployment and demanding greater social and political freedoms, and making calls for President Hassan Rohani and Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei to step down.

In December, Rohani said "people are absolutely free to criticize the government and protest, but their protests should be in such a way as to improve the situation in the country and their life," adding that "criticism is different from violence and damaging public properties."

Despite Rohani's assurances, authorities have since cracked down on protesters and detained those openly critical of the clerical establishment.

In May, several people were killed after residents of the city of Kazeroon protested a local government decision to split the city into two.

In March, several women who attempted to stage a protest in Tehran to mark International Women's Day were detained.

In February, Iranian security officers arrested dozens of women who protested in Tehran against the compulsory hijab by removing their head scarves in public.

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Mass Protests Breaks in Tehran Bazaar

Postby Atusa Qajar » Tue Jun 26, 2018 12:23 pm

Mass Protests Breaks in Tehran Bazaar
Iran Protests Jump Sparks the Uprising

Uprising Always Starts from the Grand Bazaar!

Beginning of the Riots
Protests started from Bazaar, spread to Parliament and Two Major Shopping Centers
Protestors Closed down the Bazaar


$ 1 = 4,200 Tuman – Official
$ 1 = 6,500 Tuman – Free Market
Trump Sanctions are bringing IRI to its knees
Protestors wanted to close down Bazaar
Security Forces fired tear gas at protestors
Collapsing economy is the root cause of protests
Protests at beginning of the year started the same way
Started from major cities and spread all over the nation
Protests at beginning of the year left 25 dead and 5000 arrested


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Iran Nationwide Revolutionary Protests Official Poster
Iran Revolutionary Fist Poster
Iran Politics Club Poster 2017 – 2018


Iran Revolutionary Protests Photo Gallery 2017 – 2018
Iran Nationwide Protests

http://iranpoliticsclub.net/photos/2017 ... /index.htm

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Tehran Bazaar Traders Protest for 2nd Day Against Rising Foreign Currencies Exchange Rate.

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A group of protesters chant slogans at the main gate of old Grand Bazaar in Tehran

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Widespread strike at Tehran Market protesting rise in price of dollar in Iran

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Iranian protesters in central Tehran on June 25, 2018.

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Protesters in the Iranian capital reportedly swarmed its historic Grand Bazaar on Monday and forced shopkeepers to close their stalls.

Major anti-regime protests break out in Iran’s capital on June 25, 2018 as merchants in Tehran’s Bazaar go on strike over regime’s corrupt economic policies that have led to price hikes.

Protesters angry over Iran's collapsing currency and struggling economy confronted police in Tehran on June 25 and closed the capital's Grand Bazaar.

Videos

Iran, Tehran – People defend themselves in protest, June 25
https://youtu.be/pFOEtqMD6u0

Iranian people in Tehran join protests. They are chanting: "down with dictator".
https://youtu.be/2iiBIiUEiN0

Protesters chanting: “No to Gaza, no to Lebanon. My life for Iran".
https://youtu.be/NrMkzsPQYWU

Protests and Tear Gas in Tehran After Currency Plunges
https://youtu.be/ncy9gGPQJMI

Widespread protest by merchants
https://youtu.be/XAJ9APl6PiY

Protest by merchants in front of Parliament, June 25
https://youtu.be/5gVFw6dEh1g

Protesters chanting: our enemy is right here, but they falsely claim it as U.S.
https://youtu.be/gkt5LFb94YU

NCRI News - Protests
https://youtu.be/sNDijTKjlS0

Articles

Iranian Police Fired Tear Gas After Protesters Swarm Tehran Bazaar

RFE
https://www.rferl.org/

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The protest came a day after demonstrators forced two major mobile-phone and electronics shopping centers in Tehran to close.

TEHRAN -- Police in Tehran have fired tear gas at a crowd of protesters who marched to the Iranian parliament on June 25 after swarming the city’s historic Grand Bazaar in anger over the country's troubled economy.

The spontaneous protest erupted at the Grand Bazaar on the morning of June 25, after the black-market exchange rate for Iran's Rial currency fell by more than 10 percent in a single day despite moves by the government support it.

Video footage of the unfolding demonstration obtained by RFE/RL showed hundreds of angry demonstrators marching in and around the Grand Bazaar, forcing shopkeepers to close their stalls.

Shopkeepers who refused to do so were mocked by the crowd with the chant, "Cowards! Cowards!"

The protest came a day after demonstrators forced two major mobile-phone and electronics shopping centers in the Iranian capital to close.

It was not immediately clear who led the protests. The semiofficial Fars news agency reported that traders gathered at the Grand Bazaar to protest "against recession," exchange-rate fluctuations, declining demand from Iranian consumers, and rising prices.

But in videos obtained by RFE/RL, the crowd at the bazaar can be heard in Persian chanting "Leave Syria, think about us," while some demonstrators shouted "Our enemy is here, not in the U.S."

RFE/RL reported that the protest at the bazaar began in a clothing market and soon spread to other markets -- including a relatively more modern area where home appliances are sold.

Meanwhile, Central Bank Governor Valliollah Seyf on June 25 responded to the rapidly falling value of the Rial by announcing plans to launch "a second foreign-exchange market" next week to battle black-market currency traders.

Speaking after a meeting between President Hassan Rouhani and officials from the Economy Ministry, Seyf said the parallel market would operate based on different exchange rates for the U.S. dollar.

He was quoted by Iranian media as saying a rate of 42,000 rials per dollar would be set for "importing essential commodities including medicine," and that importers and exporters would "have to agree on the rate for importing nonessential goods."

The Iranian Students News Agency (ISNA), which is close to Rouhani’s administration, reported on June 25 that a third exchange rate between 60,000 and 65,000 rials per dollar will be announced soon.

ISNA and the Mehr news agency also said that the state of confusion and ambiguity in the markets was reinforced by other officials who have spoken about plans for other foreign exchange rates.

The Tasnim news agency quoted the head of Iran's Chamber of Guilds, Ali Fazeli, as saying that the situation at the bazaar had calmed and that protesters' demands were being "delivered through the chamber to the government."

He made those remarks after the demonstrators -- chanting "Don’t fear, don’t fear, we are all together" -- marched to the Iranian parliament building.

As the crowd filed through the streets of the capital calling on others to join them, the size of the demonstration swelled into the thousands.

Similar economic demonstrations broke out across Iran at the end of 2017 and quickly spread to some 75 cities and towns -- growing into Iran's largest protests since unrest over the disputed 2009 presidential election.

Violence at those demonstrations, which continued into early January, left 25 dead and nearly 5,000 people detained by authorities.

*

Deadly Clash Between Security Forces, Militants in Southeastern Iran

Three Iranian security personnel and three militants have been killed in a clash in the southeast of the country near the border with Pakistan, Iran’s state media report.

Reports said the fighting took place in the border city of Mirjaveh in Sistan-Baluchistan Province late on June 25.

Iran's Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC) said its ground forces killed a “terrorist group” as it tried to enter Iran.

The Sunni militant group called Jaish al Adl, or the Army of Justice, claimed that its fighters killed 11 Iranian security personnel.

None of the casualty figures could be independently verified.

Iranian security forces frequently clash with militants and drug traffickers in Sistan-Baluchistan. The province lies on a major smuggling route for Afghan opium and heroin.

The population of the province is predominantly Sunni, while the majority of Iranians are Shi’a.

*

Iran protesters confront police at parliament in Tehran; tear gas fired at them

Amir Vahdat

Times of Israel
https://www.timesofisrael.com/

Demonstration in capital underlines widespread unease as rial drops against dollar following Trump's withdrawal from nuclear deal

Image
A group of protesters chant slogans at the main gate of old Grand Bazaar in Tehran

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Protesters angered by Iran’s cratering economy confronted police officers in front of parliament on Monday, with security forces firing tear gas at them, according to online videos, the first such confrontation after similar demonstrations rocked the country at the start of the year.

The unplanned demonstration came a day after protests forced two major shopping centers for mobile phones and electronics to close in Tehran and after demonstrators earlier closed its Grand Bazaar.

It also signaled widespread unease beneath the surface in Iran in the wake of President Donald Trump’s decision to withdraw America from Tehran’s nuclear deal with world powers.

It wasn’t immediately clear who led the protests. Iran’s semi-official news agencies Fars, ISNA and Tasnim described the protests at the Grand Bazaar as erupting after the Iranian rial dropped to 90,000 to the dollar on the country’s black market, despite government attempts to control the currency rate.

Videos posted to social media showed protesters at the bazaar heckling shopkeepers who refused to close, shouting in Farsi: “Coward!”

A short time later, about 2 kilometers (1.25 miles) from the Grand Bazaar, videos shared by Iranians on social media appeared to show a crowd confronting police at parliament. The videos show tear gas in the air and protesters screaming, “They attacked us with tear gas!” Another man is heard shouting: “Come back!”

Other videos appeared to show police charging into the crowd.

State media in Iran did not immediately report the Grand Bazaar demonstration. Only Fars reported on the parliament protest, which it described only as shopkeepers asking “lawmakers to stop rising prices.”

The head of Iran’s Chamber of Guilds, Ali Fazeli, later was quoted by Tasnim as saying the situation at the bazaar is calm.

“Their demands are delivered through the chamber to the government, and these are being pursued by us,” he said.

Tehran’s sprawling Grand Bazaar has long been a center of conservatism in Iranian politics and remains an economic force within the country — despite the construction of massive malls around the city. Bazaar families opposed the Iranian Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi and supported the 1979 Islamic Revolution that saw him replaced by the Shiite theocracy and elected officials.

At the end of last year, similar economic protests roiled Iran and spread to some 75 cities and towns, becoming the largest demonstrations in the country since its 2009 disputed presidential election. The protests in late December and early January saw at least 25 people killed and nearly 5,000 people arrested by authorities.

Image
A group of protesters chant slogans at the old grand bazaar in Tehran, Iran, June 25, 2018. (Iranian Labor News Agency via AP)

However, those protests largely struck Iran’s provinces as opposed to Tehran itself. Analysts believe hardliners likely encouraged the first protest that took place in Mashhad to weaken the administration of President Hassan Rouhani, a relative moderate cleric within Iran’s politics. The protests then spiraled out of control, with people openly criticizing both Rouhani and Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.

Rouhani’s government has struggled with the economic problems, which have seen high unemployment. A government-set exchange rate of 42,000 rials to $1 has quickly been surpassed in the black market. On Monday, state television quoted Iranian Central Bank chief Valiollah Seif as saying the government plans to create a parallel market next week to combat the black market.

Meanwhile, some hardliners have called for new elections or for Rouhani’s civilian government to be replaced by a military-led one. The Fars news agency, believed to be close to Iran’s hardline paramilitary Revolutionary Guard, made a point Monday to publish an article from the Sobh-e No daily newspaper describing the government as being ready to “bow down to foreign threats and sit at the negotiation table.”

*

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Bibi’s Football Message to Iranians

Postby CR » Thu Jun 28, 2018 6:33 am

Bibi’s Football Message to Iranians

Bibi’s Video Message to the People of Iran
Benjamin Netanyahu sends a special soccer message to the Iranian people


Bibi agrees with the Iranian Opposition

People of Iran:

Your enemy is neither USA or Israel.
Your enemy resides right there in Iran.
Your enemy is the IRI Islamist Regime.
Your enemy is plundering the Iran’s natural resources and budget.
Your enemy sends the money to Terrorists from Yemen to Lebanon.
Your enemy takes the food out of your mouth and sends it to Hezbollah and Hamas.
Your enemy collapsed the Iranian economy.
Your enemy needs to be destroyed, so you can live free.

You have the power to free Iran.


Image

Image

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Videos

Football

Persian
https://youtu.be/brK7xZBItoE

English
https://youtu.be/bQdX1kpcArI

Water

Persian
https://youtu.be/vM0siOv6oKg

English
https://youtu.be/1qZORdDEc3Q

Prime Minister of Israel Official YouTube
https://www.youtube.com/user/IsraeliPM

*

Article

Netanyahu hails Iranian people’s ‘courage’ in anti-regime protests

In video, PM also congratulates Iran national soccer team on World Cup draw with Portugal, expresses hope it will play Israel

Times of Israel
https://www.timesofisrael.com

Image
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in a video published by his office on June 27, 2018. (Screen capture: YouTube)

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu praised Iranians on Wednesday for showing “courage” in mass protests this week against their government and its economic policies, following the collapse of the country’s currency amid the renewal of US nuclear sanctions.

The protests, which began on Monday in Tehran and around the country — including economically hard-hit cities like Kermanshah in western Iran — featured shouts of “Death to Palestine,” “No to Gaza, no to Lebanon” and “Leave Syria and think of us,” highlighting Iran’s continued support for Palestinian groups and Syrian President Bashar Assad despite the country’s dire economic state. Chants of “We don’t want the ayatollahs” and “Death to the dictator” were also heard at some rallies.

Showcasing his soccer skills in a video posted on social media, Netanyahu drew a parallel between the demonstrations and the Iranian soccer team’s “impossible” feat on Monday, when it scored a 1-1 draw against Cristiano Ronaldo’s Portugal in the FIFA World Cup, including blocking a penalty kick by the superstar. He added that he hoped to eventually see Iran play a match against Israel.

Stopping Ronaldo is “almost impossible,” said Netanyahu, “but the Iranian team just did the impossible.”

“To the Iranian people I say: You showed courage on the playing field, and today you showed the same courage in the streets of Iran,” the prime minister said in the video.

“Iran has many problems — air pollution, water scarcity, billions wasted on terror,” he added. “Can you imagine what would happen if the Iranian government, instead of wasting your money in Syria, in Yemen, and in unnecessary wars in the Middle East, would start investing it in solving these problems in Iran?

“That’s why I’ll never stop advocating for peace with the Iranian people,” he continued. “One day, I hope to watch Iran’s soccer team go head to head against Israel in a free Tehran. On that day, we’ll all be winners.”

Defense Minister Avigdor Liberman made a similar appeal to the Iranian people in a Persian-language post to his social media accounts on Tuesday.

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Iranian protesters in central Tehran on June 25, 2018. (AFP Photo/Atta Kenare)

“Citizens of Iran, where’d your money go?” Liberman wrote. “As of today, despite the economic difficulties at home, the Iranian regime continues to invest billions in Syria, Hezbollah, [Palestinian] Islamic Jihad, the Houthis in Yemen and Shiite militias in Iraq,” Liberman wrote, according to a Hebrew translation from his office.

He said Iran had agreed to provide those groups with $2.5 billion in 2018 alone, on top of the $14 billion he said the country has invested in Syria over the years.

Liberman similarly congratulated Iranians on their national team’s “wonderful” World Cup performance. Iran was knocked out of the tournament Monday after the tie with Portugal, despite an inspiring performance.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani on Tuesday sought to calm growing discontent at the tanking economy, assuring the public the country would be able to withstand the new sanctions imposed by US President Donald Trump in the wake of the American exit from the Iran nuclear deal earlier this year.

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Defense Minister Avigdor Liberman leads a faction meeting of his Yisrael Beytenu party in the Knesset, on June 4, 2018. (Miriam Alster/Flash90)

In speech broadcast live on state TV, Rouhani blamed the spontaneous demonstrations that erupted across the country a day earlier on “foreign media propaganda,” and accused the US of waging “an economic war” against Tehran.

“Even in the worst case, I promise that the basic needs of Iranians will be provided. We have enough sugar, wheat, and cooking oil. We have enough foreign currency to inject into the market,” Rouhani said according to the Reuters news agency.

The president accused Washington of waging a “psychological, economic, and political war” on Iran, and warned it would pay a high price for exiting the 2015 accord that lifted international sanctions in exchange for a scaling back of Tehran’s atomic program.

“Withdrawal was the worst decision he [Trump] could make. It was appalling. It hurt America’s global reputation,” he added. “The US cannot defeat our nation, our enemies are not able to get us to their knees.”

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Iran’s president Hassan Rouhani gives a speech in the city of Tabriz in the northwestern East Azerbaijan province on April 25, 2018, (Atta Kenare/AFP)

In recent years, Iran has provided financial aid to Palestinian terror groups Hamas and Islamic Jihad, Lebanon’s Hezbollah, Yemen’s Houthi rebels and Shiite militias in Iraq. Since the start of the Syrian civil war in 2011, Tehran has poured a reported $6 billion into propping up Assad’s government.

At the end of last year, similar economic protests roiled Iran and spread to some 75 cities and towns, becoming the largest demonstrations in the country since its 2009 disputed presidential election. The protests in late December and early January saw at least 25 people killed and nearly 5,000 arrested.

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Khoramshahr, Iran Protests for Dirty Water & Drought

Postby CR » Sun Jul 01, 2018 2:33 pm

Khoramshahr, Iran Protests for Dirty Water & Drought

Mass protests broke in Khoramshahr, Khuzestan, South of Iran. The protests were for drought, dirty drinking water and years of neglect and incompetence by the officials.

Iran has a major drought problem due to officials’ incompetence and neglect to recycle and application of neo water purification and conservation systems.

Video

Khoramshahr Protests – Water Drought and Dirty Water
https://youtu.be/evzHVnB8ZUM

Article

Gunfire, clashes amid Iran protests over water scarcity

Jon Gambrell
Associated Press

Gunfire erupted as Iranian security forces confronted protesters early Sunday amid demonstrations over water scarcity in the country's south, violence that authorities said wounded at least 11 people, mostly police.

The protests around Khorramshahr, some 650 kilometers (400 miles) southwest of Tehran, come as residents of the predominantly Arab city near the border with Iraq complain of salty, muddy water coming out of their taps amid a yearlong drought.

The unrest there only compounds the wider unease felt across Iran as it faces an economic crisis sparked by President Donald Trump's decision to withdraw America from Tehran's nuclear deal with world powers.

Protests began in Khorramshahr, Abadan and other areas of Iran's oil-rich Khuzestan province on Friday. The demonstrations initially were peaceful, with protesters chanting in both Arabic and Farsi.

But late Saturday and into early Sunday morning, protesters began throwing stones and confronting security forces in Khorramshahr, according to widely shared online videos. State television aired images of rocks and broken glass covering sidewalks, as well as smashed ATMs. Women and children fled as gunfire echoed.

Heavy machine gun fire could be heard in one video showing demonstrators dragging away a man who couldn't walk. Another video appeared to show a man carrying a Kalashnikov assault rifle on the back of a motorcycle near protesters.

State TV reported Sunday afternoon that "peace had returned" to Khorramshahr and an unspecified number of protesters had been arrested. It said some demonstrators carried firearms during the unrest.

It's unclear what sparked the violence. Iranian Interior Minister Abdolreza Rahmani Fazli told journalists Sunday there had been no deaths. A deputy to Fazli later said the violence wounded one civilian and 10 police officers, according to the semi-official ISNA news agency.

"Such protests are directed by the propaganda of opportunists from places and people that are recognized by us as foes," Fazli said. "You observe how they are fueling such incidents in the foreign media and in the cyberspace these days."

Khorramshahr and the wider Khuzestan province have seen pipeline bombings by Arab separatists in the past. Tens of thousands of civilians and soldiers were killed in the province during the 1980s Iran-Iraq war.

Exacerbating that unrest is the drought. The Iran Meteorological Organization estimates 97 percent of the country faced some form of drought. Analysts also blame government mismanagement for diverting water away from some farmers in favor of others.

"Although Iran has a history of drought, over the last decade, Iran has experienced its most prolonged, extensive and severe drought in over 30 years," said a recent report by the Food and Agriculture Organization, a United Nations agency.

Some 230 people were poisoned in Khuzestan province after a 20-hour water outage in Ramhormoz county led to drinking water not being chlorinated, the semi-official Fars news agency reported Sunday. The protests did not appear to be linked to the poisoning.

The protests overnight came after three days of demonstrations last week in Tehran, including protesters confronting police outside parliament and officers firing tear gas at the demonstrators. The rallies led to the temporary closure of the city's Grand Bazaar.

The anger is fueled by the Iranian rial plunging to 90,000 to the dollar — double the government rate of 42,000 — as people watch their savings dwindle and shopkeepers hold onto some goods, uncertain of their true value.

Similar economic protests roiled Iran and spread to some 75 cities and towns at the end of last year, becoming the largest demonstrations in the country since the months-long rallies following the 2009 disputed presidential election. At least 25 people were killed and nearly 5,000 arrested during the protests in late December and early January, which took place largely in Iran's provinces rather than the capital.

The economic crisis has been fueled by Trump's May 8 decision to pull the U.S. out of the 2015 nuclear deal and restore sanctions. International firms that made billion-dollar deals with Iran largely have pulled out of them, while the U.S. now is demanding its allies stop buying Iranian oil.

Iran's first Vice President Eshaq Jahangiri on Sunday mocked the U.S. for "begging the Saudis" to increase oil production to drive down rising global oil prices. Trump claimed Saturday that Saudi Arabia might increase its production by some 2 million barrels of oil a day after a call with King Salman. Saudi Arabia later acknowledged the call but did not mention Trump's 2-million-barrel claim.

"If any country attempts to take Iran's place in the oil market in this battle, we will consider it a big treachery to the Iranian nation and the world community and they will surely pay for this betrayal someday," Jahangiri said, without elaborating.
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Mass Protests for Lack of Clean Water in South Iran

Postby Atusa Qajar » Mon Jul 09, 2018 4:24 pm

Mass Protests for Lack of Clean Water in South Iran
Protests continue in Khuzestan


Second Day of Protests in Southern Iran For Lack of Water

RFE
https://en.radiofarda.com/

Image
Iran - Borazjan - A large crowd protesting water shortage in this city.

People in the southern Iranian city of Borazjan held protests Sunday evening for a second day in row over lack of drinking water.

The official government news agency IRNA reported that 350 protesters gathered in the city center, but this number seems too low compared with thousands of protesters who had come out the previous day.

IRNA also did not report on what the protesters were shouting during the noisy gathering, but videos obtained from social media show people chanting slogans such as, “Death to the dictator” and “Don’t be afraid - we are all united”.

The previous day, the Friday Prayer leader and other city officials who tried to speak to the gathering were chased out by angry protesters.

According to local reports, the taps in Borazjan have been dry for several days and residents blame corruption and mismanagement by local authorities for the water crisis.

In recent weeks, there have been many water protests in Iran’s southern provinces and many citizens were arrested or indicted of “incitement”.

A provincial official in Borazjan admitted that since the beginning of the spring, the water supply to the area has decreased by 30,000 cubic meters daily. There are reports that the reason for the decrease is misuse of the water by influential people to irrigate their agricultural projects.

*

Iranian Government’s Slow Response to Undrinkable Water in Khuzestan Sparks Protests

Iran Focus
https://www.iranfocus.com/en/

Image

London, 6 July - Last Friday, the purified-water shortage in southwestern Iran saw the staging of one of the largest water-related protests in Iran this year. Residents of the Khuzestan provincial cities of Khorramshahr, Abadan, and Ahvaz say their water supplies have been polluted for days despite pledges by Iranian authorities to quickly resolve the problem.

Khuzestan, home to mostly ethnic Arabs, is Iran’s main oil producer and contains the country’s largest oil refinery but remains economically disadvantaged compared to northern provinces. Its people have gone weeks without access to clean water. Local water supplies have been undrinkable due to high salinity and mud, and the population has been relying on fresh water distributed by state-hired tankers. However, the supply has not been sufficient, driving up the price of bottled water.

Iranian officials promised that clean, running water will be restored to cities in Khuzestan by Friday as part of the next phase of a water distribution project called Ghadir, yet provincial residents say they had seen no signs of the government fulfilling its pledge.

According to Iranian state media, hundreds of demonstrators joined together in a protest in Khorramshahr on Friday, which turned violent by Saturday. A video posted on social media displayed police firing tear gas at demonstrators, and gunfire was heard in the background. 11 people were wounded, 10 of them officers. Iran's judiciary also confirmed the arrest of 10 protesters.

Water shortage protests have also been reported on social media in Abadan, and the provincial capital of Ahvaz.

On Wednesday, a Khorramshahr resident confirmed that security continued to be tight in the city. Allegedly, the police have been using concrete barriers to block roads leading to a central square, in an attempt to quell the protests that began on Friday. The resident also claimed that there were reports of police detaining demonstrators indiscriminately. The lack of independent media access has made it difficult to assess the situation in Khorramshar.

Last week, locals blamed the water crisis on suspected government transfers of scarce water supplies to Iraq and nearby Kuwait. In fact, last month, Khuzestan residents broke open and filmed a pipe carrying fresh water toward the Iraqi border. Iranian citizens were outraged by the video, which rapidly spread across social media.

However, Iranian Energy Minister Reza Ardakanian denied the allegations that selling fresh water is being sole to Iran’s neighboring countries.
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Teen Girl Arrested for Posting Dance Video Online

Postby Atusa Qajar » Mon Jul 09, 2018 4:28 pm

Teen Girl Arrested for Posting Dance Video Online
Maedeh Hojabri arrested for posting dance video at Tehran, Iran
In support of her, women post dance videos all over social media


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Maedeh Hojabri was arrested by Iranian police after she posted a video of herself dancing. (Instagram)

Image

Video

Maedeh Hojabri arrested for dance video in Tehran
https://youtu.be/dJ7qs0dRKao

Article

Iranian woman arrested after posting Instagram video of her dancing, prompting outrage among users - FOX
http://www.foxnews.com/world/2018/07/09 ... users.html

Bedroom Police: Iranian Teen Detained over Instagram Dance Videos - Breitbart
https://www.breitbart.com/jerusalem/201 ... ce-videos/

Iran women dance in support of arrested Instagram teen

BBC
http://www.bbc.com/

Image

Women in Iran have posted videos of themselves dancing online, in support of a teenager who was arrested.

Maedeh Hojabri had gathered thousands of followers on Instagram with videos of herself dancing to Iranian and Western pop music.

On Friday, state TV broadcast Ms. Hojabri's apparent confession.

Social media users shared videos and messages supporting the young dancer, using hashtags such as one that translates as #dancing_isn't_a_crime.

The Iranian government has strict rules governing women's clothing and dancing with members of the opposite sex in public is banned, except in front of immediate family members.

Ms Hojabri's videos showed her dancing at home without the mandatory headscarf, or hijab.

Several other dancers have reportedly also been arrested in recent weeks.

Blogger Hossein Ronaghi commented: "If you tell people anywhere in the world that 17 and 18-year-old girls are arrested for their dance, happiness and beauty on charges of spreading indecency, while child rapists and others are free, they will laugh! Because for them, it's unbelievable!"

One Twitter user wrote: "I'm dancing so that they [the authorities] see and know that they cannot take away our happiness and hope by arresting teenagers and (girls like) Maedeh."

This is not the first time dancers in Iran have been arrested for dancing.

Earlier this year, an official in the city of Mashhad was arrested after footage emerged showing a crowd of men and women dancing at a mall in the city, while six people were arrested for Zumba dancing in August.

In 2014, six young Iranians who posted a video of themselves dancing to Pharrell Williams' hit song Happy on the streets and rooftops of Tehran were given suspended sentences of up to one year in prison and 91 lashes.
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17 Year Old Dance Teacher & Student Arrested in Iran

Postby CR » Mon Jul 09, 2018 5:23 pm

17 Year Old Dance Teacher & Student Arrested in Iran

In Iran, they arrest people for dancing!
Dancing is Illegal in Islam and Iran


Best Maedeh Hojabri Dances + Interrogation
https://youtu.be/3fpEyPKVsbA

Maedeh Hojabri Interview
https://youtu.be/WIctOyqkvQs

Related Movie to this Subject

Watch this interesting movie

Desert Dancer: Afshin Ghaffarian Story
viewtopic.php?f=19&t=2040
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Protests & Riots Across Iran

Postby Atusa Qajar » Sat Aug 04, 2018 12:25 pm

Protests & Riots Across Iran

Protests will continue until Collapse of IRI

Trump is with the Iranian People

Death to IRI Islamist Regime

Death to Mullahs and Hezbollah

Image
Iran Nationwide Revolutionary Protests Official Poster
Iran Revolutionary Fist Poster
Iran Politics Club Poster 2017 – 2018


Image
Futurist Faravahar Iran Flag
Present Green, White and Red Order Iran Flag
Iran Politics Club Futurist Faravahar Tricolor Iran Flag


Image
Blood Faravahar Flag
Iran Politics Club Futurist Faravahar Blood Trim Iran Flag


Iran Online News - IPC Central
http://iranpoliticsclub.net/news/index.htm

Chapter 14: Iran Politics Club Flags
Pictorial History of Iranian Flags

http://iranpoliticsclub.net/flags/IPC/index.htm

US Maximum Sanction & Pressure Works

4th Consecutive day of protests and riots across Iran due to economic collapse. Sanctions and US pressure must continue until collapse of IRI.

Image

Image

Image

Videos

KARAJ, Iran, August 1, 2018. Anti-regime protests resume for second night
https://youtu.be/zKvpTwFJIYU

'Death to The Dictator' - Protests Spread to Several Iranian Cities
https://youtu.be/IpaIiDnQjv0

Iran, August 2, 2018-Shahin Shahr, Isfahan, Anti government protests and slogans
https://youtu.be/FizNDQfyuYU

Shiraz, Iran, August 2. Protesters chant: "Not Gaza, Not Lebanon, My life for Iran"
https://youtu.be/ALBUn_RUWFE

Police and Demonstrators Clash on the 3rd Day of Protests
https://youtu.be/jtEmCFqyZOs

Clashes Between Iranian Protesters & Regime Forces in Isfahan
https://youtu.be/xcUo9VA5YLU

Aug 3 - Iran protests erupt in Karaj for 4th consecutive day
https://youtu.be/wpjuSxsX5Io

News Videos

CBS News
'Internal Dissent' Grows in Iran as Economic Protests Threaten 'Downfall of Regime'
https://youtu.be/D_hyF_syIbc

News NCRI August 3
https://youtu.be/96HF37YDbUU

News NCRI August 1
https://youtu.be/PMyIaFEE_lk

Photos

Iran Revolutionary Protests Photo Gallery 2017 – 2018
Iran Nationwide Protests

http://iranpoliticsclub.net/photos/2017 ... /index.htm

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Iranian Cities Hit by More Protests Over Economic Woes

RFE
https://www.rferl.org/

Image
A screen grab from an amateur video that appears to show protests in Shiraz on August 2 as unrest spreads across Iran amid a deepening economic crisis in the country.

One demonstrator was reportedly fatally shot in northern Iran as hundreds of people returned to the streets of several Iranian cities on August 3 for a fourth consecutive day of protests amid growing anxiety over the country's economic difficulties and the return of U.S. sanctions.

Iran's Fars News agency reported on August 4 that a man was killed during a protest in Karaj, about 50 kilometers west of Tehran, when someone fired a gun from a passing car.

The agency also reported that about 20 protesters in Karaj were detained by security forces.

An amateur video sent to RFE/RL, which could not be verified, appeared to show police confronting demonstrators in the city of Karaj.

Iranian media reported that demonstrators attacked a Shi'ite seminary west of the capital, Tehran, on August 3 as protests against economic woes turned into antigovernment rallies.

Iranians are angered by high inflation and increasing economic hardship caused in part by the dramatic decline of the national currency, the rial.

In the town of Eshtehard, 100 kilometers west of Tehran, riot police dispersed several hundred people who chanted slogans against the government late on August 3, with some throwing rocks and bricks at a Shi'ite Muslim seminary, the semiofficial Fars news agency said on August 4.

In Washington, the U.S. State Department said on its Persian-language Twitter account on August 3: "While it is ultimately up to the people of Iran to determine their country's path, America supports the voice of the Iranian people, which has been ignored for a long time."

'Death to Khamenei'

Amateur videos sent to RFE/RL appeared to show dozens of protesters in the capital Tehran, with some chanting "Death to Khamenei," in a reference to Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.

Other demonstrators could be heard chanting, "Iranians, shout your demands."

There were reports of a heavy police presence in the center of Tehran and in its northern neighborhoods.

Another amateur video sent to RFE/RL appeared to show police confronting demonstrators in the city of Karaj.

There were no immediate reports of casualties or arrests in Tehran or Karaj.

Protesters have also staged demonstrators in the cities of Mashhad, Isfahan, and Shiraz.

The protests have come as Iranians brace for the return of U.S. sanctions following President Donald Trump's decision in May to withdraw from the 2015 nuclear deal between Tehran and world powers.

Under the deal, Iran received sanctions relief in return for limits to its nuclear program.

On August 7, Washington will reimpose sanctions on Iran's purchase of U.S. dollars, its trade in gold and precious metals, and its dealings with metals, coal, and industrial-related software.

Sanctions will also be reapplied to U.S. imports of Iranian carpets and foodstuffs as well as on certain related financial transactions.

*

Reports: Protests Continue Across Iran; Seminary Attacked

Reuters
Dubai UAE
https://www.reuters.com/

Image
In this picture taken by a citizen journalist, Iranian security forces dressed in black confront anti-government protesters in Iran’s third-largest city, Isfahan, during demonstrations that began July 31, 2018, and continued Aug. 1, 2018.

Sporadic protests were taking place in cities in Iran for a fourth day, with demonstrators attacking a Shiite seminary west of Tehran, according to Iranian news agencies and social media Saturday, as Iranians brace for a return of U.S. sanctions.

Hundreds have rallied in cities across the country, including Tehran, Isfahan and Karaj, according to videos posted on social media, to protest against high inflation caused in part by a plunging rial over fears of the reimposition of crippling sanctions Aug. 7.

US Sanctions

In May, the United States pulled out of a 2015 deal between world powers and Tehran under which international sanctions on Iran were lifted in return for curbs on its nuclear program.

Washington decided to reimpose sanctions on Iran upon its withdrawal, accusing it of posing a security threat, and has told countries they must halt all imports of Iranian oil from Nov. 4 or face U.S. financial measures.

The protests have often begun with slogans against the high cost of living and alleged financial corruption but quickly turned into anti-government rallies.

Riot Police

In the town of Eshtehard, 100 km (63 miles) west of Tehran, riot police intervened late Friday to disperse about 500 people who chanted slogans against the government, with some throwing rocks and bricks at a Shiite Muslim seminary, the semi-official news agency Fars said Saturday.

In Tehran, street demonstrators chanted "Death to the dictator," according to a social media video, which could not be independently verified.

In Washington, the U.S. State Department said on its Persian-language Twitter account: "While it is ultimately up to the #people_of_Iran to determine their country’s path, #America supports the voice of the Iranian people, which has been ignored for a long time."

On Aug. 7, Washington will reimpose sanctions on Iran’s purchase of U.S. dollars, its trade in gold and precious metals and its dealings with metals, coal and industrial-related software.

Sanctions will also be reapplied to U.S. imports of Iranian carpets and foodstuffs and on certain related financial transactions.

Iran’s oil exports could fall by as much as two-thirds by the end of the year because of the U.S. sanctions, putting oil markets under huge strain amid supply outages elsewhere in the world.

*

In Iran Protests, Women Stand Up, Lift Their Hijab, For Their Rights

NPR
https://www.npr.org/

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Vida Movahed stands on a telecommunications box, holding a headscarf on a stick in protest against Iran's mandatory hijab rules, in Tehran in December. Since then, Iranians have staged various protests for women's rights.

Tension is rising between Iran and the United States these days. But Iran's leaders are facing pressure from various sides at home, too.

Ordinary Iranians are mounting protests that refuse to go away, despite a sharp response from the authorities.

The demonstrations began to make news late last year, focusing largely on economic hardship. As those protests continued in cities around the country, another movement re-emerged: young women standing up against the enforcement of conservative Muslim strictures on their dress and behavior.

Similar protests have gone on for years, sometimes unnoticed outside Iran.

Atefeh Ahmadi, a 29-year-old freelance translator from Tehran, says she was intrigued when she started seeing the resurgence of images and videos of women standing on electrical boxes in public squares and removing their headscarves.

"I saw the videos and I thought to myself, this could do some good if it's an ongoing thing," she tells NPR. So one day, she tried it herself, and the video and photographs of her went viral on social media.

Then on March 8 — International Women's Day — she tried a new kind of protest.

"Me and two of my friends went to the subway," she says. "We sat in the women-only car and sang a well-known feminist song. We also handed out pamphlets promoting women's rights."

In the song's chorus, the trio repeated the words: "I am a woman."

Ahmadi says they were almost arrested that day but managed to escape.

The protest drew attention and, after she was publicly identified in a documentary as one of the participants, she chose to leave Iran for Turkey later in March.

Meanwhile, the protests continued and spread beyond the headscarf. Women posted videos and images of themselves singing and dancing, which is prohibited under Iran's strict version of Islam.

A Facebook page called "My Stealthy Freedom," started in 2014 by New York-based Iranian activist Masih Alinejad, features photos and videos of women defying Iran's headscarf law.

Facebook and Twitter are banned in the Islamic Republic, but many Iranians access the social media sites through private online networks that mask users' locations, ducking the censors. Other popular platforms like Instagram have also been blocked temporarily from time to time — "to keep the peace," according to authorities.

Offline, the government has responded to the protests by cracking down, including a series of sweeping arrests on university campuses that was documented recently by Human Rights Watch.

The demonstrations have gained international attention, including among senior Trump administration officials. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has spoken out and the State Department has tweeted — in Iran's Farsi language — in support of Iranian women's rights.

Dress code by law

Ahmadi says she supports all the various protests. But for her, it's taking on — or taking off — the mandatory hijab, a headscarf and other modest garments, that's important.

Image
Atefeh Ahmadi, a 29-year-old freelance translator from Tehran, lets her hair show in Turkey. She fled Iran after staging protests for Iranian women's rights.

"Some may want to focus on other hardships," Ahmadi says. "The demands may seem diverse, but I think the ultimate point is to end the rules on hijab."

Under Iran's strict interpretation of Islam that's melded with government since 1979, women and girls over the age of 9 are required to cover their heads and everything but the face and hands. Offenders face fines or jail time.

During a period last century, Iran and various other Middle Eastern countries had banned the hijab. Nowadays, many places have a strict dress code for women. But Iran is one of the only countries where the penal code mandates it.

Ahmadi says although the women's protests are less visible in the media these days, people are still defying the law to keep the issue alive.

"There was no specific positive reaction from the government, in terms of making a positive change in laws against women," she says. "There was only a series of arrests and prosecutions."

In late 2017, police said they would stop arresting people for dress code violations. But harassment of women by the "morality police" continued.

Ahmadi says public awareness of the issue has grown, however. Some of the arrested women were forced to make televised confessions, which Ahmadi says only incensed the public more, and generated more debate around the issue.

Despite the generally hard line taken by the authorities, Ahmadi believes the protests have gained momentum, and won't stop until the government addresses the fundamental problem.

"Because it seems that the state has a problem with women's bodies," she says. "Everywhere that a woman's body is involved, there will be a reaction from the state. And that will spark more protests."

*

Thousands protest for a fourth consecutive day in Iran on eve of US sanctions

Independent
https://www.independent.co.uk/us

Iranians angry with the regime take to the streets fearing further economic woes when American sanctions kick in on Monday

Image

Thousands of people have rallied for a fourth day in Iran against soaring unemployment and a dramatic drop in the currency, as the country braces for the return of crippling US sanctions next week.

Police reportedly fired tear gas and rubber bullets into crowds in a bid to quell the unrest which first unfurled on Monday but have spread across at least 10 towns and cities.

The Iranian Rial has lost nearly two thirds of its value in the last six months alone. Many fear it will only plunge further after renewed American sanctions kick in on Monday, sparking the protests and a run on gold and hard currency.

Footage posted online showed hundreds of furious people gathering in Isfahan, Iran's third city, with some burning tires to counter tear gas and setting fire to police vehicles. State news agencies also reported "scattered protests” in the southern cities of Shiraz and Ahvaz, to the north in Mashhad and Sari and in Karaj, west of Tehran. Rallies were also recorded in Arak and Shahin-Shahr.

“It was unexpected and seemed to start on social media, there was not much planning. It shows a sudden outburst of anger,” said Saeed Ghasseminejad, an Iran specialist at the Foundation for Defence of Democracies.

He said the unrest posed a major threat to the regime which was struggling to appease the people.

“It is not as widespread as protests in December but has united the lower and middle-income classes. Both small towns and major cities have joined. As the sanctions intensify you will have the upper-middle classes joining too,” he added.

This week’s protests are among the largest to hit Iran since a wave of unrest erupted across more than 80 cities in December and January also over the country’s economic woes. At least 25 people were killed during that time and thousands were arrested.

Protests and strikes re-ignited in June when the Rial took a major hit after President Trump walked out of a 2015 nuclear deal with Iran and ordered his administration to reimpose “maximum“ sanctions by 6 August. Trump administration officials at the time warned they were pushing US allies to cut oil imports from Iran to zero by November.

Iran’s oil sales could drop from 2.4 million barrels per day to as low as 700,000 by the end of the year, according to Facts Global Energy analysis firm.

On Friday Javad Zarif, Iran's foreign minister said China, which heavily relies on Iranian crude, was working to try to restart the nuclear agreement. He said China was "pivotal" to salvaging the pact.

But amid the increasing pressure on the economy, last week the Rial hit a record low on the black-market with the Iranian currency trading at a rate of around 120,000 to the dollar.

Ghasseminejad said with fresh sanctions it would likely sink to as low as 200,000 to the dollar meaning further unrest was certain and would likely turn political.

Protesters have already begun chanting against the country’s religious and political leadership as well as against Iran’s costly interventions in conflicts in Yemen, Syria and the Palestinian Territories.

In videos purportedly taken in the town of Gohardasht, a suburb of Karaj, dozens of demonstrators can be seen in the streets chanting “death to the dictator” against Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali] Khamenei.

In other videos reportedly shot in Tehran, the capital, people were filmed shouting “Get lost you Mullahs”. Some even called for the return of Iran’s king, Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, who was deposed in the Islamic revolution of 1979.

Maryam Rajavi, head of the controversial opposition group the National Council of Resistance, claimed on Friday that police had used tear gas, rubber bullets, and blank cartridges in an attempt to quell "an uprising".

In a statement shared with The Independent the exiled leader said that a number of protesters had also been wounded but gave no further details.

"People are worried that if they don't buy things today, they won't be available tomorrow," said Ali, a vendor at Tehran’s historic Grand Bazaar, which staged rare strikes two months ago.

Ali added that wholesalers were hoarding new stock while they waited to see how the crisis unfolded.

Holly Dagres, a non-resident fellow at the Atlantic Council, said the crisis and the protests were only going to continue.

"All of the protests are significant as it is showing growing discontent of the Iranian people... and they are only going to keep going on and off as these sanctions pile on. It shows people are fed up with rampant corruption," she said.

"[The government] is trying to put a band aid on the problem but there are also water shortages, power outages, the rial losing its worth, people are disenchanted with the government in general," she added.

Articles

Protests Pop Up Across Iran, Fueled by Daily Dissatisfaction
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/04/worl ... tests.html

Protests largely fueled by economic frustration pop up across Iran
https://www.cbsnews.com/news/protests-l ... ross-iran/

Scattered protests in Iran as U.S. sanctions loom
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-iran ... SKBN1KP06X

Is Iran's Hassan Rouhani a lame duck president?
https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/ne ... 271654.cms

30 Years on From the 1988 Iranian Massacre and No One Has Been Brought to Justice
https://www.iranfocus.com/en/index.php? ... Itemid=137

Fresh Protests in Iran Could Soon Spell Mullahs’ Overthrown
https://www.iranfocus.com/en/index.php? ... Itemid=109

Iran Holding Major Naval Drill in Gulf With Over 100 Vessels, U.S. Official Says
https://www.haaretz.com/middle-east-new ... -1.6340681

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