Long Live the King

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Long Live the King

Postby Liberator » Sun Jun 11, 2006 1:11 pm

I'd like to recognize monarchies around the world and highlight some of their services to their nations in here.


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Source: http://www.aftonbladet.se/vss/resor/story/0,2789,838179,00.html


The people of Thailand are celebrating 60 years on the throne by King Bhumibol Adulyadej.

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Opa Chunyrak proudly celebrates the Thai King's, 60 years on the throne, with her yellow wristband.

The Thai people have a strong affiliation to their monarchy that has done great deeds for their ancient nation. The wristbands which they wear on this day have "We love His Majesty the King" written over them, and brought in SEK 20million (very roughly Euro 2,2 million) in sales this year which will go to various environmental projects.

The Thai people unlike Iranians know the worth of their culture and history. God bless them and many well wishes in the future to the Kingdom of Thailand.

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Maybe one day the people of Iran will wake up for the nightmare they have CHOSEN to live in and decide to honor their culture, their history, and their ancient monarchy - all of which they decided to work against in 1979. In 1979 they put aside culture, history, dignity, and honor aside and embraced AHREMAN - may this never happen again and may Iranian culture soon be restored and honored once again in Iran.


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Last edited by Liberator on Mon Jun 12, 2006 2:57 am, edited 3 times in total.
"Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable" -J.F.K

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Postby Liberator » Sun Jun 11, 2006 2:48 pm

For more coverage on the celebrations and the King's devotion to his country please visit:

http://www.bangkokpost.com/60yrsthrone/


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Postby Liberator » Sun Jun 11, 2006 2:48 pm

"Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable" -J.F.K

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Postby IPC » Sun Jun 11, 2006 10:45 pm

Lib:

You have a topic "Long live the king - Nepal" in this room. Now you have one about King of Thailand. If King of Nepal has done nothing, at least he stopped the Internationalist Vatan Foroush and Proletariat Dictatorship lovers at the bay, King of Thailand is also an environmentalist and a do gooder, charitable person. I'd say Emperor of Japan, King of Spain, King of Malaysia, and number of other monarchs are positive models. You can pick the positive ones, the nationalist ones, you have the knowledge. Why don't you eliminate the other topic, combine these two topics here and add on more to it and make a single topic of "Long live the king", a general topic about all positive constructive monarchs (Kings and Queens) of the world? I don't mean useless rich no good for nothing royalty (Charles and his old rag doll), but I mean Monarchs who make a difference and are positive models, so why don't you?

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Postby Liberator » Mon Jun 12, 2006 2:58 am

Although I do not see the Nepalese Monarchy as a "democratic" one, and see much space of improvement towards democracy, I still believe that their fight against the Communist Rebels is a noteworthy one to be recognized.


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Long live the king!
You have to be a perfect ignoramus or an astoundingly grand idiot to assert that Maoists in Nepal wish to impose a democratic republic

May 9, 2006
iranian.com



I do believe the media manipulate people, though probably there is no grand plot. Like consummate liars, they believe what they state. The "truth" it seems according to most media is that the world is better off if everyone were secular, left-of-centre, Clinton-sympathizing, spineless, witless hypocrites, but preferably unconsciously so, as thought may prompt irksome changes of opinion (you might for example conclude you dislike the abusive, self-righteous, rake-in-the-money polemicist and vulgar pamphleteer Michael Moore, and go vote for Bush again).

The media and "informed" opinion fan and fuel the left-of-centre consensus (though the wasteful, consumerist, automatic lives most people lead belie their lofty opinions). Still, the task is easy, since they are preaching to an amenable congregation, the converted. I recently thought something like all this (aside "What the F**ng Sh*te is that?) as I watched the news on demonstrations in Nepal. The general gist of the reporting is: democracy supporters have forced the despotic monarch King Gyanendra to hand power back to the people.

Check the images, and you will see the usual riff-raff in the street, and doubtless members of the middle class (in scenes reminiscent of events almost 30 years ago in an ill-fated country not a million miles from Nepal), shouting and waving red flags with the hammer-and-sickle. These are the democracy protesters, and no news agency or website mentions any communist agitators and sympathizers among them. An AP or Reuters report explained recently in the background verbiage that concludes every report that Nepal's government has for years been fighting against Maoist rebels who want to replace the monarchy with a "democratic republic."

You have to be a perfect ignoramus or an astoundingly grand idiot to assert that Maoists in Nepal wish to impose a democratic republic. No communist anywhere has ever wanted a democratic republic: they have all sought to impose the worst type of dictatorship that would invade every facet of your life. Communists generally divide into a minority of dogged idiots and a majority of the mischievous or plainly evil: enemies of civilization.

Read "The Devils" by Dostoevsky, for an eloquent description of the mind of revolutionaries. The villains in that novel are "nihilists:" radicals of the 1870s and 1880s in imperial Russia, insignificant in the harm they inflicted compared to the heinous offal later known as Bolsheviks, but with a similar bad attitude.

The Bolcheviks - those who followed Lenin and were later emulated by communist scum like themselves in China and elsewhere - were so vile they eventually provoked horror and execration among other leftists and erstwhile allies like the Mensheviks (actually the "majority" most of the time in the Social-Democratic Party of Russia, the mother party of the two groups) or Socialist Revolutionaries. The Socialist Revolutionaries and Mensheviks ended up fighting the Reds in Russia's civil war of 1918-20, alongside the White Generals.

The King of Nepal thankfully has not yet left the country: he has not packed his bags and run away, like some irresponsible monarch. And the Maoists (who AP's idiotic correspondent says are fighting for a democratic republic) have already denounced the civilian government formed by opposition forces (the liberals and leftists, if you will). Clearly, iron-fisted, murderous, totalitarian rule is the only goal of these atheist Bin-Ladens. Why not just call them terrorists?

My friends of course know I do secretly sympathize with the people. I skipped my daily Starbucks in Mexico City on May Day - when Mexicans were boycotting American goods - and not just because a protesting crowd outside the American embassy was obstructing entry into Starbucks next door.

Actually, I was sympathizing with the millions from Cancun, and there is no Starbucks in Cancun, a horrible place. If you were to let the "people" form their ideal living space - building their style of shops, selling junk they cherish, with blaring loudspeakers at shop entrances to attract mindless shoppers and horrible discos called Coco Bongo - you would get Cancun, a cement-covered "white-trash" dump. How to ruin a beautiful spot.. Now I understand what the Comtesse du Barry dreaded when she said to her friend Louis XV: "After us, the deluge will come.." (the sovereign people later guillotined her).
"Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable" -J.F.K

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Postby Liberator » Wed Sep 20, 2006 3:30 pm

The Monarchy in Sweden

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http://www.sweden.se/templates/cs/FactS ... x?PageNr=1


The Swedish monarchy, regarded as the world’s most modern, has become more popular in recent years. The current king, Carl XVI Gustaf, enjoys the support of as much as 80 percent of the entire population. And Crown Princess Victoria has become one of the country’s most important ambassadors.

A royal family with French origins

The Swedish monarchy is one of the world’s oldest and is firmly rooted in a parliamentary democracy. Swedish monarchs go back a thousand years and have belonged to 11 dynasties of which the current one, the House of Bernadotte, has ruled the longest. The Swedish royal family is related to all the reigning royal courts of Europe.

Carl XVI Gustaf and his family

Sweden’s current king, Carl XVI Gustaf,is the seventh monarch of the House of Bernadotte. He was born on April 30, 1946, the fifth child and only son of Hereditary Prince Gustaf Adolf and Princess Sibylla of Sachsen Coburg-Gotha. The hereditary prince died in an air crash in Denmark the following year.

At the age of four, Carl Gustaf became crown prince of Sweden when his great grandfather Gustaf V died and was succeeded by the then 68-year-old Gustaf VI Adolf, the crown prince’s grandfather. After 23 years as monarch, Gustaf Adolf died and the 27-year-old crown prince became King Carl XVI Gustaf in 1973. His motto is ‘‘For Sweden – with the times.’’

In 1972, the crown prince met his German-Brazilian future wife, Silvia Sommerlath, who was born in 1943 in Germany. This was in Munich during the Olympic Games, where Silvia was chief hostess. It ‘‘just said click,’’ the royal couple said in an interview upon their engagement in 1976. They married on June 19 of the same year.

Queen Silvia is a trained interpreter without either royal or noble origins and is the first Swedish queen who has been a professional woman. She quickly organized her own royal household and has a strong commitment to social issues. She has modernized the position of queen so it is in step with the times.

The king and queen have three children: Crown Princess Victoria Ingrid Alice Désirée, Duchess of Västergötland, born on July 14,1977; Prince Carl Philip Edmund, Duke of Värmland, born on May 13, 1979; and Princess Madeleine Thérèse Amelie Josephine, Duchess of Hälsingland and Gästrikland, born on June 10, 1982. Since 1982 the royal family has lived at Drottningholm Palace, outside Stockholm.

For Sweden – with the times

Sweden is one of the world’s most stable and egalitarian democracies, where the monarchy has strong roots and public support. The monarchy, as shaped by the current king, has been adapted to the age we live in. As head of state, the king is Sweden’s foremost unifying symbol, apolitical and without formal powers, based on the new Constitution approved in 1974. The king’s duties are mainly of a ceremonial and representative nature.

A full program

Once a week, the king holds a planning meeting together with the queen, the crown princess and their closest staff members. They discuss the invitations and queries they have received concerning participation in events by the king, the queen and the crown princess and decide what is most important. They make sure that their appearances are spread throughout Sweden. The royal family receives thousands of invitations per year.

King Carl Gustaf has a strong environmental commitment and is a recognized authority on environmental issues. Among other things, he has received the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Award. He participates annually in the Stockholm Water Week and the awarding of the Water Prize. The king is likewise deeply committed to the preservation of Sweden’s cultural heritage and considers it important, for example, that the royal palaces should be open to the public in order to show their collections and parks.

King Carl Gustaf is a very active monarch and keeps up to date with current affairs and the business sector throughout Sweden.

Besides two to three state visits abroad per year, he participates in international trips organized by the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences and the World Scout Foundation.

Under the collective label ‘‘Royal Colloquium’’ the king organizes high-level seminars on various themes in collaboration with Swedish scientists.

When the king is prevented from performing his duties as head of state, for example during a trip abroad to a distant or inaccessible location, Crown Princess Victoria or her younger siblings, Prince Carl Philip or Princess Madeleine, in the order specified, assume the duties of temporary regent.

Female heir to the throne

The job description of Sweden’s head of state is found in the Constitution. The heir to the throne should be educated to be able to represent Sweden in a constitutionally correct way, which is also appreciated by the people. This is vital because in order to be effective, the heir to the throne needs the support of the Swedish people. In this case the crown princess has a model in her father, King Carl Gustaf, who has modernized the Swedish monarchy in keeping with the times, with a protocol that makes things easier for all those involved.

Since 1980 Sweden has had fully cognatic succession, which means that the first-born child of the monarch is heir to the throne regardless of gender. Crown Princess Victoria will become Sweden’s 70th monarch, and the third female monarch in the history of the Kingdom of Sweden.

No palace schools

Crown Princess Victoria began her formal education at municipal schools, switching to a private school when she began her upper secondary studies. She graduated in 1996 with good grades despite dyslexia, which meant she had to devote a lot of time and energy to her school work.

The crown princess’s studies at universities and other academic institutions comprise an important part of her education – but as heir to the throne she must continuously ensure the breadth of her education on social issues. Courses on individual subjects are of greater importance than concentrating on an academic degree.

After graduating from upper secondary school, in the autumn of 1996 the crown princess studied French for foreign students at the Université Catholique l’Ouest in Angers, France. Starting in 1998, the crown princess was enrolled at Yale University in the United States for five semesters, taking courses in geology, history and international relations. During her period at Yale, her interest in international issues deepened and she took private lessons on current politics, wrote an essay on the role of the United Nations in Iraq and completed internships at the UN in New York and the Swedish Embassy in Washington, D.C.

Later, in the spring of 2002, she continued her international studies at the Department of Peace and Conflict Research, Uppsala University, Sweden.

Alternating studies with internships and representation

She has studied the structure and function of Swedish society, among other things through internships at the Swedish Government Offices and various institutions. Through a study program at the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida), for example, she has visited Uganda and Ethiopia. She has also interned at the offices of the Swedish Trade Council in Berlin and Paris, has undergone basic military training and has taken courses at the Swedish National Defense College in Stockholm.

As crown princess, she has participated in a state visit to Iceland and visited Saudi Arabia and Hungary with Swedish delegations. She has also traveled in Bangladesh and Sri Lanka in order to study development assistance work in these countries. She has been in Brazil to attend the Volvo Ocean Race in Rio de Janeiro.

Continuing studies in social science subjects have been demanding. Her course in constitutional policy included the applications and consequences of the rules concerning the election system, parliamentary government, referendums, federalism and the court system. The crown princess has also completed a political science course.

Cross-border collaboration

The crown princess can rely on her parents’ encouragement in her education. For some years she has also been in continuous contact with European heirs to the throne belonging to her own generation. She has had especially close ties with her Nordic colleagues, that is, the heirs to the thrones of Denmark and of Norway.

The crown princess has her own mentor, who provides both moral and practical support and accompanies her on official assignments, especially on trips that the heir to the throne takes to represent Sweden, which she regularly undertakes as part of her education. To date, she has visited Japan, the United States, Australia, Macedonia and Kosovo, among others.

Her mentor’s task includes ensuring that there is room – between her studies and official duties – for cultural experiences, both planned and spontaneous. In addition to her mentor, the crown princess has a secretary who takes care of practical desk work and a lady-in-waiting in her household.

Crown Princess Victoria also participates in foreign state visits and official visits to Sweden, the opening of the Riksdag, the National Day celebration on June 6, the Nobel Festivities and official banquets at the Royal Palace in Stockholm. She acts as temporary regent when the king is prevented from performing his duties as head of state.

Ambitious and dedicated

The crown princess is in great demand as an ambassador of successful Swedish endeavors in culture, art and design, which are fields that she herself enjoys. Through her work at the Swedish Trade Council, for example, she has gained a good grasp of the international marketing of Sweden and Swedish products. Her enthusiasm and knowledge make her a much-appreciated representative of Sweden. The crown princess is down-to-earth and approachable, has a good sense of humor, and is hard-working and respectful of traditions.

Brief facts about the crown princess

Marriage: The day the crown princess marries, it will be with the permission of the king. The king, in turn, turns to the government for permission. This is in compliance with the 1980 Act of Succession.

Foreign language skills: English, French and German

Leisure interests: Nature and outdoor pursuits.

The royal family’s summer paradise islocated in Öland, a large island in south-eastern Sweden. During the summer months at the Palace of Solliden, the family gathers to spend time with each other privately. The crown princess relaxes by helping out with the gardening and has learned bee-keeping and honey production.

The crown princess has artistic talents and both paints and draws. She is interested in art and appreciates the cultural heritage her ancestors left behind. She is also proud to be able, during major celebrations, to wear the historical jewelry worn by previous generations of the royal family.

She is a genuine animal lover. Her favorite animals are dogs.

Office: Along with the king and the queen, the crown princess has her office and staff at the Royal Palace in Stockholm’s Old Town.

Home: For the time being at Drottningholm Palace outside Stockholm.

The House of Bernadotte

The founder of the current royal family, Karl XIV Johan, was born Jean Baptiste Bernadotte in Pau, southern France, and was the son of a procurator. Jean Baptiste had begun to study law, but when his father died he instead became a soldier. Young Bernadotte made a brilliant career thanks to the French Revolution. He advanced to Marshal of France and Prince of Ponte Corvo.

As a general, he married Desirée Clary, former fiancée of Brigadier General and future Emperor Napoléon Bonaparte. In 1810, the 47-year-old Jean Baptiste became crown prince of Sweden after the Danish prince who had been chosen to succeed the childless King Karl XIII died of a stroke. The French marshal was one of four candidates to the Swedish throne in a war-ravaged Europe.In 1818, Karl Johan became king of Sweden and the couple’s only child, Oscar, became crown prince.
"Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable" -J.F.K

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