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Back to index   Persian Mythology, Gods and Goddesses
Part Three
 

Persian Mythology, Gods and Goddesses
Part 3: Pictorial Research and Guide
Ahreeman X

1st Edition: December 10, 2006
2nd Edition: October 7, 2014


Tawrich Persian Demoness of Blood Hunger with Ahreeman Ancient Persia God of Evil at the background

Persian Mythical Characters, Creatures and Plants

Camros
A bird creature from Persian mythology which collects the seeds of Gao-kerena, the Tree of Life. Camros brings those seeds to the God Tir (The Rain God) who mixes them with water. The mixture provides the people of Iran with life, but nothing is left for those who strive for the destruction of Iranians.

Div
Div or Deeb or Deev are a Persian Mythical race of creatures basically living in North Iran's Caspian Sea Shores and Jungles. They have horns and are of monstrous looks and powers.


Div in Shahnameh
Rostam (Persian Hero) battles Foulad Zereh Div
Shahnameh (Epic Book of Persian Kings) is Master Abolqasem Ferdowsi Tusi's masterpiece.
Ferdowsi is the reviver of the Persian Language.


Div in Shahnameh: Rostam battles Div-e Sepid (The White Div).


Div-e Sepid (The White Div)
Div-e Sepid (White Daeva) the Persian Shahnameh (Epic Book of Persian Kings) Mythical Creature


Div Persian Mythical Creature on Azerbaijan Stamp
Beware of the Div who comes to the children’s nightmare


Div Persian Mythical Creature
The Red Div has amazing powers.


Foulad Zereh Div (King of Divs)
Modern interpretation of the Foulad Zereh Div (Steel Armored Div) of Shahnameh, one of the most powerful Div Kings of Divs (Daeva Persian Demons).


Div Female Daeva Persian Mythical Creature


Div Female Daeva Persian Mythical Creature in full body


Gray Div, a powerful adversary of humans
Div Female Gray Daeva Persian Mythical Creature


Queen Div – The Mighty Female Warrior Div
Div Female Daeva Persian Mythical Warrior Creature Queen

Gao-kerena
Tree of Life in ancient Persian mythology. The Tree of Life whose roots are situated in the middle of the world ocean Voura-kasa. The bird Camros perches in the top of this tree. The seeds of the tree can resurrect the dead and grant immortality to those who eat them. It is a very Valuable Tree.

Homa
Mighty Mythical Persian Bird, carrier of Aryans. Later on Homa became the emblem of the Iran Air.


Homa Persian Mythical Bird, the mighty carrier of the Aryans


Homa Persian Mythical Bird, the mighty carrier of the Aryans, Persepolis, Iran


Homa Columns Persepolis Iran


Homa Column Top at Persian Sunset, Persepolis, Iran


Homa Persian Mythical Bird Design


Homa Iran Air Logo
National Airline of Iran: Homa


Homa Iran Air Ad
Iran Air: Our Mission is Your Safety


Homa Persian Mythical Bird Art
Homa Logo is used for various brands and organizations such as:
Iran Air, Homa Tehran FC Football (Soccer) Team and others.

For more Homa images and Persian literature review:

Plastic Persian (2 Parts)

Karshipta
A bird in Persian mythology which can speak. Karshipta was sent to spread the faith of Ahura Mazda to the men who were gathered to protect themselves from the harsh winter that was to destroy the mankind.

Khara
A massive three-legged jack-ass which stands in the middle of the sea Vourukasha (Voura-kasa). The creature has nine mouths, one horn and six eyes: two are on the usual place, two are on top of its head, and two are in the hump. With the help of his sharp eyes he overcomes the evil and helps to order the globe.

Pari (singular) - Paris (plural)
Pari is a Persian Angel
Paris or Peris according to ancient scriptures are Female mythical creatures. The Paris (Pari is singular and Paris are plural) are Persian spirits of great beauty who guide the mortals on their way to the Land of the Blessed. Paris also battle the Daevas. Paris are in addition, the messengers between gods and men. Paris are angel-like beautiful and powerful spirits.


Pari Aryan Indo-Persian Vedai Era Angel Art


Pari Persian Angel Art – Traditional Pari


Pari Persian Angel of Justice – Modern Interpretation of Pari
Pari Beautiful and Powerful Persian Angel

Persian Griffin
Persian winged lion is a popular Persian mythical creature. Some Persian Griffins have beaks or horns.


Persian Griffin of Achaemenian Era Wall Decoration Roundel


Persian Griffin Art


Persian Griffin Statue


Persian Griffin on the wall of the Susa Palace of Darius, Susa, Iran

Persian Sphinx
Winged man-beast or Winged man-lion
is an ancient Persian mythical creature and a winged protector of the Persian palaces.


Persian Sphinx Protector


Persian Sphinx Winged Protector Carving


Left: Persian Sphinx Palace Winged Protector Wall Carving
Right: Persian Sphinx Faravahar Glazed Wall Carving Art

Qoqnos (Phoenix)
Or Qoqnus is a Mythical Persian version of Phoenix. A Bird which burns and then rises from the ashes of defeat to gain the glory of victory. In danger, Qoqnos burns herself as a suicide rebirth! Qoqnos never dies because when she is near death, the bird will burn herself to once again arise from her own ashes on to her next life!


Qoqnos the Persian Phoenix


Qoqnos is caught so she burns herself to death; therefore, she can rise from the ashes (Suicide Rebirth)! No one could capture Qoqnos alive!


Qoqnos the Persian Phoenix carving


Qoqnos (The Persian Phoenix)

Simorq
Simorq (30 Birds) is a massive bird with the body of peacock, beast-like head and the sharp claws. Its natural habitat is a place with plenty of water. According to the legend, the creature is so old that it has seen the world destroyed three times over. In all that time, Simorq has learned so much that it is thought to possess the knowledge of all ages.


Simorq Persian Mythical Bird
Anahita on Simorq's back, flies the skies of Persia.


Simorq Persian Mythical Bird Sassanid Silver Plate


Simorq carries baby Zal (Shahnameh)

Yima
The Persian version of Noah of Ark. Yima the Persian patriot was warned by Ahura Mazda about the coming of a disastrous winter. He was told to build a vara (enclosure) wherein he was to shelter himself and all living things man and beast. When the winter was over, Ahura Mazda sent the Karshipta bird to spread the good words. Do you see yet another Biblical borrow and adaptation by Christianity from the Persian Texts?!

There are many other Persian Mythical creatures but above are the important ones.

* * *

Persian Major Arch-Demons and Demonesses (Daevas and Drugs)

Persian Zoroastrian Mythology has seven demons who cause plagues and diseases and who fight every form of faith. Daevas are the male servants of Ahreeman The Dark Lord. Drugs or Drujs are the female servants of Ahreeman. They fight Amesha Spentas. The term "Devil" and "Div" (Deev) are derived from Daeva. The Daevas and Drugs are of 2 Demonesses (Females) and 5 Demons (Males) which makes a total of 7. Number 7 is the holy Zoroastrian number. The seven Major Daevas and Drugs are: Aesma Daeva, Aka Manah, Indra, Nanqaithya, Saurva, Tawrich and Zarich. Daevas (Demons) are 'wrong gods' or 'false gods'.

Aesma Daeva
Demon (Male)

Aesma Daeva the Persian Demon of Lust and Anger is a powerful Daeva.
One of the Daevas, Aesma Daeva (Madness or Fury) is the demon of lust and anger, wrath and revenge. His wrath is mainly directed towards the Cow (Sacred Cow). He is the personification of violence, a lover of conflict and war. Together with the demon of death, Asto Vidatu, he chases the souls of the deceased when they rise to heaven. He is rival to Sraosa.


Aesma Daeva Persian Anger Demon


Aesma Daeva Persian Demon of Lust and Anger

Aka Manah
Demon (Male)

Aka Manah the Persian Demon of Sensual Desire and Evil Intentions
One of the Daevas. He is the personification of sensual desire. He came to tempt Zarathustra. His Arch-Rival is Vohuman. Aka Manah has many desirable and undesirable, feminine and masculine faces to deceive the people.


Aka Manah the Persian Demon


Aka Manah the Persian Demon of Sensual Desire and Evil Intentions
The Classical Interpretation of Aka Manah


Aka Manah the Persian Demon of Sensual Desire and Evil Intentions
The Modern Interpretation of Aka Manah

Indra
Demon (Male)

Indra the Persian Demon of Apostasy
Indra is one of the seven Daevas and the personification of apostasy. Not to be confused with the Indira, The Aryan God of Thunder. His eternal Amesha Spenta enemy is Arashtat (Asha vahishta).


Indra the Persian Demon of Apostasy

Nanqaithya
Demon (Male)

Nanqaithya the Persian Demon of Discontentment and Dissatisfaction
He is the personification of discontentment. His eternal opponent is Armaiti.


Nanqaithya the Persian Demon of Discontentment and Dissatisfaction

Saurva
Demon (Male)
He is one of the seven main Daevas. His eternal opponent is Khshathra Vairya.

Tawrich
Demoness (Female)

Tawrich Persian Demoness of Blood Hunger
The Drug (Druj) Tawrich is the Persian Demoness of Blood Hunger. She is the personification of hunger. She is obsessed with blood. Her eternal opponent is Haurvatat. Tawrich is a favorite of Ahreeman.


Tawrich Persian Demoness of Blood Hunger with her black snake


Tawrich Persian Demoness of Blood Hunger
Classic Representation of Tawrich


Tawrich Persian Demoness of Blood Hunger
Modern Representation of Tawrich


Tawrich Persian Demoness of Blood Hunger with her Blood Leeches
Futuristic Representation of Tawrich

Zarich
Demoness (Female)

Zarich Persian Demoness of Aging
Drug (Druj) Zarich is one of the female members of the Daevas and Drugs. She is very masculine. She is the personification of aging. Her eternal opponent is Ameretat.


Zarich Persian Demoness Druj of Aging

* * *

Persian Minor Demons (Khord Daevas)

Apaosa
Apaosa Persian Demon of Drought
A demon who brings drought and aridity. He rides a black horse, symbol of darkness. At last, Tir had defeated Apaosa.


Apaosa Persian Demon of Drought rides his Black Horse

Asto Vidatu
Asto Vidatu is The Persian Demon of Death. No one escapes him.


Asto Vidatu Persian Demon of Death

Azhi Dahak
Azhi Dahak the Persian Demon Dragon
Ahreeman Created Azhi Dahak to aid him in his dark deeds. Azhi Dahak is a transformation of a demon into the body of a reptile (snake) or a flying reptile (dragon). Azhi Dahak sets fire to all that exist and any human which gets in his way. Azhi Dahak blows fireballs, has strong claws and tears humans and other animals in many pieces. Azhi Dahak is a fearsome demon.

Azhi Dahak (Ezhdeha or Dragon) is a storm demon from Iranian mythology. He steals cattle and brings harm to humans. It is a snake-like reptile monster, sometimes portrayed with one or three heads and two or six eyes who also personifies the Babylonian oppression of Iran. The monster will be captured by the warrior God Thraetaona and placed on the mountain top Damavand. In a final revival of evil, it will escape its prison, but at the end of time (Fraso-Kereti) it will die in the river of fire Ayohsust. Azhi-Dahak also symbolically represents Astiak, the last Shah of Media overthrown by Cyrus The Great.

One Headed Azhi Dahak


Azhi Dahak (Ezhdeha) is the Persian Storm Demon


Azhi Dahak (Ezhdeha) or Persian Dragon is the Persian Storm Demon


Fire Breathing, Smoke Exhaling Azhi Dahak (Ezhdeha)
Persian Dragon is the Persian Storm Demon


Traditional Persian Azhi Dahak (Dragon)


Battle of Azhi Dahak and Rostam (Epic Book of Persian Kings)
Persian Dragon fights Rostam the Persian Legendary Hero of Shahnameh


Azhi Dahak and Persian Maiden

Three Headed Azhi-Dahak


Three Headed Azhi Dahak Persian Dragon Demon


Three Headed Persian Dragon Azhi Dahak Fire Breathing Storm Demon

Bushyasta
In Zoroastrian mythology, the Yellow Persian Demon of lethargy and sloth. He is the evil genius which causes men to oversleep and to neglect their Holy duties. An ancient Persian demon of laziness who tries to prevent people from working. He is one of the Daevas.


Bushyasta the Persian Yellow Demon of Sloth

Dahaka

Dahaka Persian Demon of Deceit and Death
An ancient Persian God of Death and Demon of Deceit and mendacity. He loves destroying life. Dahaka is usually depicted with three heads, while scorpions and lizards crawl all over his body.


Dahaka Three Headed Persian Demon of Deceit and Death - The Original Dahaka


Dahaka Persian Demon of Deceit and Death - Modern Versions of Dahaka


Dahaka Persian Demon of Deceit and Death - Contemporary Dahaka


Dahaka Persian Demon of Deceit and Death in the Night


Dahaka the Persian Demon of Deceit and Death – the Sci-Fi Futuristic Version

Gandarewa
A Persian Water-Demon who continually tries to devour the good things of creation.

* * *

Persian Minor Demonesses (Khord Drugs)

Agas
Agas the Persian Evil Eye Demoness
The Evil Eye Demoness. Persian Demoness of illness. She personifies evil that is perceived or performed by the eye. Her name means "Evil Eye". Agas inflicts Evil Eye on the healthy and makes them sick.


Agas the Persian Evil Eye Demoness


Agas the Persian Evil Eye Demoness – The Contemporary Interpretation
Agas with her Bad Luck Owl and Evil Snake

Drug (Druj)
"The Drug" Demoness of Lies, is one of the most famous Drugs. She is the eternal enemy of Arashtat who stands for the Truth.


Druj (Drug) Persian Demoness of Lies


Druj Persian Demoness of Lies – the Contemporary Version


Druj and Dragon
Druj Persian Demoness of Lies with Persian Dragon Demon (Azhi Dahak)

* * *

At Last

I hope this research can help to quench and feed some of the never ending thirst for knowledge which you, the young generation and lovers of Iran may have. In the up coming days, we will have many more researches on Persian History, gathered, prepared and published for you.

Always remember,

"There are two types of people:
Those who are Persians,
And then
Those who want to be Persians!
It is Great to be a True Persian.
"

"How can you build your future if you do not know your past?"

"Regain your national identity to regain your Persianhood, so you can insure the survival of Iran."

Pure Persian Pride

Dr. X

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