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Mitra Persian Sun Goddess & Mitraism
Foundations of Christianity – Chapter 4

 

Mitra Persian Sun Goddess and Mitraism: Foundations of Christianity!
Mitra and Mitraism Pictorial History
Book of Mitra in 5 Chapters – Chapter 4

New Research and Photo Gallery of approximately 300 images
Ahreeman X
December 14, 2018


Mitra Persian Sun Goddess – Modern Mitraic Art
Mitra with her Lighting Torch shines light upon the dark land

Mitraism and Shiite Islam

After the Arabo-Islamic invasion and occupation of the Persian Empire, the major Mitraic Temples the same as many other buildings such as palaces, libraries and even complete cities were leveled and destroyed. Arabs were desert dwellers. These Bedouin only knew of Quran, Jihad, Looting, Raping, Murder and promises of 72 Virgins in the Islamic Heaven. They had no need for books, libraries, universities, art, culture, science and civilization; therefore, they looted, burned and leveled complete cities and in some cases cultures!

Islam, a Dangerous Political Ideology! – Part 1

Islam, a Dangerous Political Ideology! – Part 2

Islam Index

For more on what Arabo-Muslims have done to Iran, read about the Arabo-Muslim Invasion Occupation of the Persian Empire:

Ctesiphon, Smoke, Fire and Blood

222 Years of Struggle for Independence of Iran (651 AD - 873 AD)
Book in 4 Parts and 15 Chapters


Mitra Persian Sun Goddess Rides Her Horse – Divinity of Mitra
Mitra in her armor with halo around her head, Sun Crest on her chest and Sun Icon on her shield, draws her mighty shining Light Persian Sword and rides her Persian white horse

As a negative struggle, Persians constructed mosques or shrines of Imams on top of the original Mitraic Temples (Mehrabe) sites to get the people to continue pilgrimage and to keep the culture alive; however, through the years, the original purpose of this action has forgotten and the public believes that these sites actually contain some Shiite Imams or members of their family’s (Shiite Saints) tombs. In addition, Mullahs had often claimed that during sleep, they had a vision (khabnama) and they were informed by the Angels that this site or that site was originally constructed on the grave of some Shiite Saint; therefore, they built many fake shrines in this manner.


Mitra Persian Sun Goddess Roman Shield
Mitra appears on top and at the bottom sacrificing the Bull. Zurvan (Aion in Latin) appears in two shapes: Dark Zurvan on the right and Light Zurvan on the left.
Zurvan (Aion in Latin) is the ancient Persian God of Infinite Time and Space. Zurvan is a No Gender God. He is Neuter, has no passion and is neutral on good or evil. Zurvan is the father of Ahuramazda and Ahreeman both. That is why he takes no sides between his sons and that is also why on this shield, he is portrayed as the Dark Zurvan (Ahreeman) and the Light Zurvan (Ahuramazda). It is the element of Duality in the original Zoroastrian Thesis.
This shield further proves that Persian Goddesses and Gods were much more dominant in the Roman culture than the public is aware. Romans did not just worship Mitra but also Zurvan and others.

Some of these Shiite Saints were fictional and others did not get buried in these locations but Mullahs created these legends and stories to build shrines for financial gains.

So, these Shiite Shrines are of 2 types:

I. Shiite Shrines fabricated by Zoroastrian Persians to keep the original location of the Mitraic Temples safe and active as a pilgrimage site.

II. Shiite Shrines fabricated by Mullahs as completely baseless locations to build shrines for profit.

In both conditions, either the Shiite Saint was never buried in these locations or did not exist at all.


Mitra Persian Sun Goddess Head Statue

Past Mitraeums and Present Shiite Shrines

Some of the real Mitraic Temples (now Shiite Imams or Saints Shrines) are:

Legend
_______
* Original Location
* Today’s Location
* Note

* Tus Mehrabe (Mitraic Temple), Sanabad, Tus, Khorasan, Iran
* Imam Reza Shrine, Mashhad, Khorasan, Iran
* Note: Tus was a large pre-Islamic major city in the Persian Empire, now it is a small city near Mashhad. Development of Mashhad as Iran’s 2nd largest city, had declined Tus. Now the original burial ground is considered a part of Mashhad. Imam Reza was never buried in this shrine. Mashhad is the first most popular Shiite pilgrimage point in Iran.

* Anahita Mehrabe (Mitraic Temple), Qom, Iran
* Fatima Masoumeh Shrine, Qom, Iran
* Note: Masoumeh was supposedly the sister of the 8th Shiite Imam Reza whom either did not exist or the least was never buried in this location. The meaning of the name Anahita is pure and innocent. The meaning of Masoumeh in Arabic is also the same. Persians created a Saint and translated her name from Persian to Arabic and built a shrine in her name for the cattle Shiite to worship. Until this day the Shiite Sheeple go there for pilgrimage. Qom is the second most popular Shiite pilgrimage point in Iran.


Mitraic Temple Mehr Underground Stairways, Maraqeh, East Azerbaijan, Iran

If you look around Iran, you will notice that a great number of Shiite Shrines are popped up all over the country. These are supposedly shrines built upon the tombs of the Arab Shiite Imams, their immediate families, their descendants or other Shiite Saints. Many of these characters whether did not exist or were not buried in these places. This is the perfect example of the “Organized Religion” becoming a “Business” and making profit off of the absolute fiction and nonsense! Pilgrims drop tons of money into these shrines for the Saints to cure them, answer to their prayers, aid them, give them salvation or simply for donations. In other words, people try to buy salvation!


Mitraic Temple Mehr Main Entrance, Maraqeh, East Azerbaijan, Iran
Mehr Temple is an Arsacid Era Temple
Arsacid Parthian Empire (250 BC - 224 AD)

Doggie Imam Shiite Shrine!

In one occasion, it is documented that someone’s dog died and he buried the dog in some place near a village. Eventually he claimed that the burial ground is the tomb of some Shiite Saint; therefore, a group of Shiite Do Gooders gathered and confirmed the authenticity of the claim. Next thing you know the Mullah of the village entered the scene to share this victory, so he indeed branded and blessed the tomb. Suddenly, the authorities of the village built a fine shrine on top of the grave and made it an official Shiite Shrine for the good Shiite pilgrims to visit.

The long story short, after a while, the shrine became a popular Shrine in the region and the little village became a Large Village and Destination for Pilgrimage! Naturally everyone from the Doggie Imam’s owner, to the Village Elders and indeed the Village Mullah benefited from this event. There were constant and ongoing Shiite Mourning Festivals, Donation Collection, Namaz Jama’at (Salat al Jama’ah) Group Prayers and Lectures by the Mullah on the site.

Ashura - This is Shiite Islam! – 5 Chapters

nformation board about the Mehr Parthian Temple, Iran
Mitraic Temple Mehr, Information Board from the Arsacid Era, Maraqeh, Iran

Translation of the above information board:

Mitraic Temple History
Mehr Temple of Maraqeh, Iran

 Mehr Mitraic Temple of Maraqeh is a stone built construction going back to the Parthian Arsacid Empire of Iran (250 BC - 224 AD) where Mitraists would gather, cherish and worship the Persian Sun Goddess.  Mitraists believe in the 4 Elements of Water, Soil, Fire and Wind. The Mitraic Temples were inspired by the sky and were built with arches and domes. Mitraic Temples had various parts such as the washing area for purification before the entrance, waiting area, the main hall and the altar. Many years later during the Ilkhanid Mongol Dynasty Era (1256 - 1343), the temple had become a Khaneqah (Dervish Temple) for the Sufi Brotherhood to gather and pray. During the Safavid Dynasty (1501 -1736) of Iran (Safavid Persian Colonial Empire), Mullah Ma’sum Maraqi was buried here, so it became a Shiite shrine where Quranic verses were engraved on the walls.
Sign,
Office of Cultural Heritage, Handmade Artifacts and Tourism of Maraqeh


Mitraic Temple Mehr Altar, Maraqeh, East Azerbaijan, Iran
Mehr Temple is an Arsacid Era Temple
Arsacid Parthian Empire (250 BC - 224 AD)

Every day of the week become blessed and there were held a different event, every week of the month. The complete establishment of the village had become rich, the village idiots become proud residents of the newly blessed holy Shiite Pilgrimage Site, the good herd of Shiites rushed the site to witness it firsthand and indeed all of this commotion was due to the death of a Great Doggie Imam! Until this day, the village is a pilgrimage point and people assume that an actual Shiite Saint had died and buried there!

The funny thing is that due to someone’s leak, the wise people know the facts and some even refer to the shrine as the “Imamzadeh Sagi” which translates to the “Doggie Imam’s Shrine”! May Allah bless the Doggie Imam’s spirit who founded the glorious pilgrimage point of the “Doggie Imam Shiite Shrine”. After all, Allah works in mysterious ways!

Religion is the perfect business to make money off of the ignorant public. In Persian, we have a famous idiom which states:

“Ta Khar dar Jahan baqist, Mofles dar nemimanad!”
Literal Meaning:
[Until there exists Donkeys in the world, the poor will not be despaired.]
Actual Meaning:
(Until there exists Religious Idiots in the world, the Con Artist Clerics will not remain poor.)


Mitraic Temple Mehr Corridor, Maraqeh, East Azerbaijan, Iran


Mitraic Temple Mehr Main Hall, Maraqeh, East Azerbaijan, Iran


Parthian Mitraic Temple Gate, Hatra, Iraq 200 BC – Persian Empire Period


Parthian Mitraic Temple, Hatra, Iraq 200 BC – Persian Empire Period

Chak Chak Fire Temple and Shahrbanu Sassanid

Special Case of Chak Chak Fire Temple, Yazd, Iran
Chak Chak Fire Temple in Yazd Province, Iran AKA Pir-e Sabz (Green Elder), even though not a Mitraic Temple, yet is valuable to Mitraism and Mitraists. Chak Chak is one of the most holy Zoroastrian shrines in the world. It is a mountain cave Fire Temple, deep in the cave and hard to reach. One has to climb a steep cliff with more than 300 steps to reach it.


Chak Chak Zoroastrian Shrine, Ardakan, Yazd, Iran
Chak Chak Monument consists of the Mountain Cave Fire Temple and the Kheileh Visitor Quarters Building

Zoroastrian Nikbanu Fake Legend

Chak Chak is a special case and has important archeological and historical value. The false narrative is that Yazdgerd III’s (Last Sassanid Emperor) 2nd daughter was escaping the Arabo-Muslim invaders army and escaped to this region. Her name was Nikbanu. Once tired and frustrated reached this mountain, she cried to Ahuramazda to help her; therefore, the mountain opened up by miracle and let her in the cave to hide, and then it closed up. The Zoroastrians claim a legend that the water fall and drips in Chak Chak is the tears of the mountain which cried for the princess and the bent tee in front of the gate is princess’ cane and so on.


Kheileh Visitor Quarters Building of Chak Chak Zoroastrian Shrine, Ardakan, Yazd, Iran

Shiite Muslim Bibi Shahrbanu Fake Legend

Shiite Muslims also have invented a story of their own. They claim that Shahrbanu, the oldest daughter of Yazdgerd III got captured by the Arabo-Muslims, taken to Medinah in Arabia, eventually married to Imam Hussein, the third Shiite Imam, went to Karbala, participated in the campaign. Once Yazid (Caliph), Shemr (General) and the ruling Bani Umayyad Caliphate defeated and killed Hussein and his followers (Beginning of the Sunni and Shiite Conflict), Shahrbanu who was very much in love with Hussein, escaped and while the Caliphate forces were chasing her, she reached a similar mountain and cave area (like Chak Chak) but not in Yazd (Central Iran), yet in Qom (Northern Iran). Shahrbanu prayed to Allah to save her, so the mountain opened up, swallowed her and then closed up. Shiite Muslims built a shrine there which is one of the most visited Shiite Shrines in the world. It is called the “Bibi Shahrbanu Shrine”. The significance of Shahrbanu is in the manner that connects the Persian Sassanid Monarchy to the Prophet Muhammad’s Family. Shahrbanu married Hussein who is Imam Ali’s son, the 4th Caliph of Rashidun and Muhammad’s cousin. This makes the connection between Persians and Arabs and the creation of Shiite Islam who are Ali’s followers legit. So Shahrbanu gives legitimacy to Ali and Shiite Islam which is the Persian version of Islam. On the other hand, this makes all the following Imams from 4th to 12th Imams, half Persian because they are Shahrbanu’s descendants. Shiite Muslims refer to Shahrbanu as a Shiite Saint, very important character in their religion and of course, the Bibi Shahrbanu Shrine is a very important Shiite Shrine.


Chak Chak Mountain Cave Zoroastrian Shrine, Ardakan, Yazd, Iran
The first and second floors are Kheileh Visitor Quarters Building. Look at the third floor. You can see a small quarter with a window. In the window, you can see the fire of the Fire Temple. That is the Fire Temple window to the outside of the cave.

Shahrbanu Sassanid the True Legend

The reality is that Zoroastrians wanted to keep this place a pilgrimage point and keep the story alive, so they twisted the story and invented a politically correct version. This way, they could keep the place a pilgrimage point and not to get slaughtered by the Shiite Muslims.


Chak Chak Mountain Cave Zoroastrian Shrine Stairways, Ardakan, Yazd, Iran
You have to climb over 300 stairs to get to the gate of the Fire Temple Shrine

What is the Truth?

Now there is Chak Chak and Bibi Shahrbanu Shrines. Two Shrines in two different cities with the same story. What is the truth? Are you ready? The historical reality is that:

I. Yazdgerd III had no daughter named Nikbanu.

II. The Shrine in Qom is a fake. Shahrbanu is not buried there. Bibi Shahrbanu Shrine is a fabricated Shiite Shrine.

III. The Chak Chak shrine is real but instead of the imaginary character Nikbanu, the real Shahrbanu is buried there. Zoroastrians had to lie about it to save their necks!

IV. Shahrbanu was not Hussein’s faithful companion, love and wife. Actually, they were never married. Shahrbanu was not running from Yazid’s troops but she was running from Hussein’s troops. Shahrbanu preferred to die than to marry a bloodthirsty murderer like Hussein. The stories of legendary Shiite martyr Imam Hussein are all made up tall tales by Shiite Muslims to give legitimacy to Shiite Islam and color it as a Persian Religion!

In the future I will write an article about Shahrbanu to once and for all expose this great Shiite lie and fabricated story. I do not want to go in details here. My point to bring this issue up, is to name Chak Chak as a valid and important Zoroastrian Pilgrimage Point, a Fire Temple and a place of interest to Mitraism, Mitraists and Mitraic Scholars.


Chak Chak Mountain Cave Zoroastrian Shrine Gate, Ardakan, Yazd, Iran
Finally you reach the Bronze Gate with Ancient Persian Soldiers Metal Work Carving


Chak Chak Fire Temple, Ardakan, Yazd, Iran
At the gate you will see a massive bent tree. The legend goes that it is Shahrbanu’s Cane. At the outside and the inside of the Temple you will see waterfall and water dripping. The legend goes that they are Cave’s Tears for Shahrbanu!


Chak Chak Fire Temple Persian Gate, Ardakan, Yazd, Iran


Chak Chak Fire Temple Persian Gate Closeup - Magnificent Metal Work


Chak Chak Cave Fire Temple Hall, Yazd, Iran


Chak Chak Fire Temple Persian Faravahar Top and Altar


Chak Chak Fire Temple Altar, Ardakan, Yazd, Iran


Holy Eternal Flame Torch and Candle / Incense Burners
Chak Chak Cave Fire Temple, Yazd, Iran


Special Zoroastrian Ceremony at Chak Chak Fire Temple, Yazd, Iran


Pilgrims burning candles at the Fire Temple Torch
Chak Chak Fire Temple, Yazd, Iran


Zoroastrian Pilgrimage at Chak Chak Cave Fire Temple Hall, Yazd, Iran


Mehregan Persian Festival of the Sun
Chak Chak Cave Fire Temple Shrine Outdoor, Yazd, Iran


Sadeh Persian Festival of Winter Fire Aryan Night Torch Rally
Zoroastrian Priestess at the front carries the Main Torch
Chak Chak Cave Fire Temple Shrine Outdoor, Yazd, Iran


Sadeh Persian Festival of Winter Fire Aryan Night Torch Rally
Chak Chak Cave Fire Temple Shrine Outdoor, Yazd, Iran

Mitraic Temples in Europe

In Iran, Shiites built Shiite Shrines above the ruins of the Mitraic Temples. In Europe, the Christians built Churches above the ruins of the Mitraic Temples. The principle was the same. People wanted to save the original locations of their places of worship (Mitraic Temples) or the charlatan Shiite Muslims and Christian clerics built these shrines and churches as the places of pilgrimage for their fictional Saints! In Europe, most of these churches are built upon the ruins of the Mitraeums.

Famous Mitraeums (Mitraic Temples) Discovered in Europe

Almost all of them are found at the basement or underground of the churches.

European Mitraeums

* Mitraeum of Ostia Antica, Italy
* Mitraeum of Caracalla, Italy
* Mitraeum of Capua, Italy
* Mitraeum of Jajce, restored at Bosnia
* Mitraeum of Dieburg, Germany
* Mitraeum of Saarbrücken, Germany

* Mitraeum of Saalburg, Germany
* Mitraeum of Serdica, Sofia, Bulgaria
* Mitraeum of Merida, Spain
* Mitraeum of London, England
* Mitraeum of Hadrian Wall, Carrawburgh, England
* Mithraeum of Ulpia Traiana Sarmizegetusa, Romania
* Mitraeum of Fertorakos, Hungary

Asian Mitraeum

* Mithraeum of Caesarea Maritima, Israel


Mitraeum of Jajce Restored at Bosnia


Mitraeum of Fertorakos, Hungary


Mitraeum of Caesarea Maritima, Israel

Zarathustra the Visionary

Zarathustra whom Nietzsche bows to him, was not a prophet of God nor he had ever claimed to be one. He was and he always claimed to be a humble poet and philosopher who was the seeker of the truth.

One of Zarathustra’s great visionary works was that he did not deny or destroy Mitraism which had come before him; furthermore, he built upon it, safe kept it, respect it and cherished it. Zarathustra may have turned Mitra from a major Goddess (in Mitraism) to a Yazata and Divinity (in Zoroastrianism); however, he kept the legend of Mitra alive.


Zoroastrian Priestess lectures about Zarathustra’s Vision at the Fire Temple, Tehran, Iran
Zarathustra (Painting) watches over the Priestess
Mehregan Persian Festival of the Sun

Persians unlike Arabo-Muslims and Half Breeds (Iranian Shiites), do not destroy everything which had come before their religion and philosophy; yet, they safe keep them and build upon them! Cyrus the Great and Zarathustra both done the same.

Zarathustra, the Real Story
Zoroastra and Zoroastrianism

The Cyrus Cylinder
Founding Documents by the Founding Fathers of The Persian Empire Series
The First Declaration of Human Rights in the Wrold


Zoroastrian Priests and Daf Player with Zarathustra’s Painting, Yazd, Iran
Mehregan Persian Festival of the Sun

One of these concepts is the original concept of “Duality” (Yin and Yang in Buddhism) which portrays in the original Zoroastrianism as Faravahar. Original Zoroastrianism believed in Duality but later on, the hierarchy of the Fire Temples and Mobeds, excluded this important principle from the Zoroastrian texts. There is no absolute Good and there is no absolute Evil, but there must be a balance between them in each person and element in the universe, so they complement and complete each other to maintain the balance.


Zoroastrian “Duality” Concept is similar to the Buddhist “Yin and Yang” Concept
The Balance Between the Dark and the Light Sides must be held
The Dark and the Light Sides complete each other
Duality Balance is a Core Concept of the Martial Arts

Meaning of Faravahar

Faravahar is an ancient Persian Symbol. Faravahar represents both Ahura and Ahreemanic symbolism. The half-human part (the upper half) is representing Ahuramazda (Ancient Persian God of Good) and the half Beast part (the lower half) is representing Ahreeman (Ancient Persian God of Evil).

In a way, Ahreeman and Ahuramazda are the two sides of the same coin and same being.


Faravahar Persian Zoroastrian Tattoo Body Art by Martin Armand

Balance between Dark and Light Sides

The Original Zoroastrian Doctrine the same as Buddhism was about the “Duality”. The Balance between the Dark Side and the Light Side must be achieved in all aspects of the human life and universal order, or else everything will collapse. Too much of the Dark or Light can flip this delicate balance; however, in later years, the hierarchy of the Zoroastrian Fire Temple and the Organized Religion had changed this important doctrine and turned it to the pure Evil (Ahreeman) and the pure Good (Ahuramazda). The reality is that there exists no absolute evil or good, but the balance must be established. Order of the universe depends on this balance.

For more information on Faravahar, read:

Faravahar 5 Parts

Faravahar History and Art Galleries
Chapter 1: History of Faravahars

Faravahar History and Art Galleries
Chapter 2: Historical Faravahars

Faravahar History and Art Galleries
Chapter 3: Modern Faravahars

Faravahar History and Art Galleries
Chapter 4: Futurist Faravahars

Faravahar History and Art Galleries
3D Persian Sci-Fi Digital Graphic Art
Chapter 5: Science Fiction Faravahars


Mehregan Persian Festival of the Sun Ceremony at Fire Temple, Kerman, Iran


Mehregan Persian Festival of the Sun Prayer at the Fire Temple, Kerman, Iran

Persian Festivals

7 Holy Persian Festivals
Persian Celebrations and Festivals, the roots, the rituals and the meaning of them is crucial for the understanding of how these events have influenced and shaped the Christian Festivals and Events.

Of course, once more, there are 7 major Persian Festivals as 7 is the Persian Holy Number of the good omen.

Chahar Shanbe Suri (Celebration of Fire) March 19
Outside Iran, due to the time difference, it usually lands on a day before the last Wednesday of the old Persian New Year but inside Iran, it lands on the last Wednesday of the old Persian New Year

Nowruz (Persian New Year) March 21
Usually lands on March 21, beginning of the Spring and rejuvenation

Sizdah Be Dar (Celebration of the 13th Day) April 2
Celebrated on the 13th day of the Nowruz Holidays to picnic

Tirgan (Celebration of the Rain) July 1
Asking for rain to heal the drought in the middle of the Summer

Mehregan (Celebration of the Sun) October 2
Celebration of Mitra (Mehr) for the light, sun and warmth held in Autumn

Yalda (Celebration of the Longest Night) December 20
Longest night of the year before December 21 (Winter Solstice), it has significance to December 25, Birth of Mitra bringing light to the world

Sadeh (Celebration of the Winter Fire) January 24
Celebration of the Winter Fire to push the cold out

and other Persian events.


Chahar Shanbe Suri Persian Festival of Fire, the Fireworks, Iran


Chahar Shanbe Suri Persian Festival of Fire, Holy Fire Gathering, Iran


Chahar Shanbe Suri Persian Festival of Fire, Jumping Over Fire, Iran
It is the tradition that while jumping over the fire, you must tell the fire:
My Yellow (Disease) to you
Your Red (Health) to me
So, you will have a healthy and good Persian New Year


Mehregan Persian Festival of the Sun College Choir Performance, Kerman, Iran


Mehregan Persian Festival of the Sun Goddess College Girls’ Choir, Kerman, Iran


Mehregan Persian Festival of Mitra the Sun Goddess Daf Players, Iran


Mehregan Persian Festival of Mitra the Sun Goddess Dance, USA


Mehregan Persian Festival of Mitra the Sun Goddess Dancers


Mehregan Persian Festival of Mitra the Sun Goddess Qashqai Tribal Women Dancers, Iran


Mehregan Persian Festival of Mitra the Sun Goddess Mitraic Dance


Mehregan Persian Festival of Mitra the Sun Goddess Mitraic Table


Mehregan Persian Festival of Mitra the Sun Goddess Outdoor, Yazd, Iran


Zoroastrian Priestess Ceremony at the Fire Temple
Zoroastrian Priestess Lectures the Crowd
Mehregan Persian Festival of Mitra the Sun Goddess, Yazd, Iran


Zoroastrian Priestess and Priest at the Fire Temple
Mehregan Persian Festival of Mitra the Sun Goddess


Professional Persian Business Women Ceremony
Mehregan Persian Festival of Mitra the Sun Goddess, UAE


Mehregan Persian Festival of Mitra the Sun Goddess Ceremony, Tehran, Iran


Zoroastrian Priestess and Priests
Mehregan Persian Festival of Mitra the Sun Goddess Ceremony, Tehran, Iran


Nowruz Persian New Year Traditional Musicians Concert, Iran


Holy Aryan Fire Dance
Sadeh Persian Festival of Winter Fire, Iran


Fire Keeper Lighting of the Eternal Torch Flame at Fire Temple
Zoroastrian Priests Read a Prayer
Sadeh Persian Festival of Winter Fire, Kerman, Iran


Night Daf Player Women Parade
Sadeh Persian Festival of Winter Fire, Iran


Night Daf Player Girls Aryan Parade
Sadeh Persian Festival of Winter Fire, Iran


Sadeh Dancing Girls
Sadeh Persian Festival of Winter Fire, Iran


Sadeh Persian Festival of Winter Fire at the Fire Temple, Kerman, Iran
Left to Right: Zoroastrian Priestess, Priest and the Fire Keeper


Sadeh Persian Festival of Winter Fire at the Fire Temple, Kerman, Iran


Lighting the Zoroastrian Holy Aryan Fire Ceremony
Sadeh Persian Festival of Winter Fire, Iran


Lighting the Zoroastrian Holy Aryan Torch Ceremony
Sadeh Persian Festival of Winter Fire, Iran


Fire Ceremony
Sadeh Persian Festival of Winter Fire, Kerman, Iran


Holy Zoroastrian Aryan Fire Dance
Sadeh Persian Festival of Winter Fire, Iran


Holy Zoroastrian Candle Fire Display
Sadeh Persian Festival of Winter Fire, Iran


Zoroastrian Priestess Lighting of the Fire Bundle
Sadeh Persian Festival of Winter Fire, Iran


Daf Player Musician Under Faravahar Banner
Sadeh Persian Festival of Winter Fire, Iran


Night Fire Dancing
Sadeh Persian Festival of Winter Fire, Iran

For more information on the Persian Festivals, read:

Iran Culture and Language Index

Now on to the Next Chapter

Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Chapter 4
Chapter 5
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