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Chapter 18: History of Iranian Military Uniforms
Afsharid Uniforms

 
     

Pictorial History of Iranian Military Uniforms
Book in 23 Chapters
Chapter 18. Afsharid
Ahreeman X

February 23, 2012


Nader Shah the Great Standard Banner 1736 – 1747
Naderi Banner of Lion and Sun

Afsharid
Afsharid Dynasty (1736 - 1749)


Afsharid Persian State Standard Banner 1736 AD - 1749 AD


Afsharid Persian Lion and Sun Standard Bearer 18 AD


Afsharid Persian Red, White and Blue Rangarang State Standard Bearer 18 AD


Nader Shah the Great and the Persian Cavalry at the gates of India 18 AD

Afsharid Persian Colonial Empire
Nader Shah the Great (1736 - 1747)
* Nader was one of Iran’s and globes greatest Military Strategists. Nader’s Campaigns are presently discussed and taught in various military academies around the globe. Nader is known as the Iranian Napoleon.

* Nader Shah the Great built the modern Iranian Armed Forces:
Imperial Persian Colonial Army
Imperial Persian Colonial Navy
Imperial Persian Colonial Marine

* Nader Shah the Great established the “Imperial Persian Colonial Empire” of the 18th Century.

* Nader had expanded the borders of the “Persian Colonial Empire” to its greatest extent since the Pre Islamic Era.
* Nader Shah Afsharid Empire’s Greatest Expansion included:
Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Azerbaijan, Armenia, Georgia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Bahrain, Qatar, United Arab Emirate, Part of Oman, Part of Uzbekistan, Part of Russian Caucasia, Part of Iraq, Part of India, Part of Saudi Arabia and Parts of Central Asia.
* Nader’s Campaigns against the Ottomans, Russians, Mughal Indians, Hotaki Abdali Afghans and Arabs are legendary.
* Notice that Nader’s Naval Campaigns and Marine Campaigns resulted in annexation of a chunk of Arabian Peninsula and islands in South and its addition to Iran.

For more information about Nader and the Afsharid Dynasty review:

Atlas of Iran Maps: Chapter 9: Afsharid


Nader Shah the Great of Afsharid Dynasty of Iran 18 AD

Naderi Elements
Nader was son of Khorasan. Nader was famous for the invention or drafting of various elements; therefore, they referred all of these elements to him. Elements such as:

Naderi Throne
Naderi Strategy
Naderi Tactic
Naderi Pistol
Naderi Sword
Naderi Dagger
Naderi Zanburak
Etc.


Nader Shah the Great and Persian Commanders 18 AD
L – R: Persian Armored Cavalry Commander, Persian Camel Cavalry Mobile Artillery Commander and Nader Shah the Great Commander in Chief of the Afsharid Persian Colonial Forces

Naderi Style
When one referred something to Nader they would use the term “Naderi” and stating Naderi this or Naderi that meant to own such quality or item (or the quality of such element or item) was so classy and so superb that it could be referred to as the “Naderi” this or that. Anything Naderi meant that it was of the best quality and top of the line. Nader had a style of his own and everything he done or owned were traces of the famous “Naderi Style”.


Nader Shah the Great Military Strategist of Iran 18 AD

Naderi Navy
Birth of the Imperial Persian Colonial Navy
Primarily Nader used to purchase battle ships from foreigners, yet in later years Iran started to manufacture her own ships.

Nader built the first Persian reliable navy since the Pre Islamic Era. Due to all the wealth and loots gained in various battles specifically Indian campaigns, he started a ship factory in Bushehr. Nader ordered lumber to be transported from Mazandaran and Gilan (North Caspian Sea Shores States) all the way to Bushehr (Port of the Persian Gulf) where the battle ships, transport vessels, speed vessels and merchant ships were manufactured. After the successful creation of the Ship factory, Nader built a strong naval base in Bushehr. Afsharid Imperial Persian Colonial Navy was born.

Manufacturing our own ships resulted in creation of a powerful navy. Creation of a powerful navy resulted in domination of power in Persian Gulf. Nader started a naval and marine campaign which resulted in annexation and occupation of today’s Bahrain, Qatar, United Arab Emirate, Part of Saudi Arabia,  Part of Oman and various other islands in the Persian Gulf. Nader’s campaign and the capture of Muscat (Oman’s Capital) was legendary.


Nader Shah the Great of Iran with Tasbih (Persian Rosary Beads) 18 AD

Why Nader Shah Created a Strong Persian Colonial Navy?
Nader Shah the Great was a student and scholar of history. Nader has learned from the history. Safavids created a powerful empire; however, they lacked a strong navy. During the first half of their reign, Safavids had no navy and during the second half of their reign they managed to create a small navy. Safavid Navy was a small and irrelevant force. Powerful Portuguese, Dutch and British Colonial Navies made the Safavid Navy to look like sail boats! Due to lack of a strong navy, Safavids could not conduct effective campaigns in the Persian Gulf and Gulf of Oman; furthermore, they had to always give in to the will of the powerful colonial navies’ (Portuguese, Dutch and British) presence in the region (Persian Gulf, Gulf of Oman and the Indian Ocean). When it came to land campaigns, Safavids were formidable but when it came to sea campaigns or marine campaigns, Safavids were irrelevant.


Nader Shah the Great of Iran with Tasbih (Persian Rosary Beads) and Jam (Persian Jeweled Gold Cup) 1736 – 1747

Imperial Persian Colonial Navy’s Role
Nader has learned from the past and saw no other option but to create a strong colonial navy. So at last Nader built the modern “Imperial Persian Colonial Navy” and then he built the “Imperial Persian Colonial Marine”. Once the Persian Strong Navy was established, then once again (since Pre Islamic Era) the Persian Empire had become a player in the regional waters. Next, Nader conducted naval and marine campaigns and seized territories on the Southern Shores of the Persian Gulf. When “Naderi Ships” roamed the Persian Gulf, Straight of Hormoz and Gulf of Oman and annexed land, the old colonial powers (Portuguese, Dutch and British) dared to object because unlike the Safavid Era, they could not impose their will on the Persian Empire. Why? Because Nader had created a Monster named the “Imperial Persian Colonial Navy” also known as the “Naderi Navy”.

Imperial Persian Colonial Navy’s role was to secure and protect the waters of the Persian Colonial Empire and to keep the foreign vessels in put. “Naderi Navy” made sure that the foreign naval vessels would perfectly understand that who the boss of the Persian Gulf is!


Afsharid Imperial Persian Colonial Navy Standard Banner 18 AD


Afsharid Imperial Persian Colonial Navy 30 Cannon Command Battleship 18 AD


Afsharid Imperial Persian Colonial Navy 24 Cannon Battleship 18 AD


Afsharid Imperial Persian Colonial Navy Battleship back area 18 AD


Afsharid Imperial Persian Colonial Navy Battleship Cannon 18 AD


Mughal Indian Campaigns
Nader Shah the Great of Iran battling Indians in India 18 AD


Nader Shah the Great at battle during his Indian Campaign


Another Bloody Naderi Battle
Nader Shah the Great at battle during his Indian Campaign
L – R: Persian Spearman (next to Back Fired Camel), Dead Indian Standard Bearer on the ground, Nader Shah (on his White Horse fighting Indians with Axe), Indian Cavalryman (fighting Nader), Persian War Elephant Unit (at the background) and Indian War Elephant Rider riding his elephant (above the cannon)

“Back Fired Camels” Tactic
Platform Pans full of combusting oil were installed on the back of the camels and put on fire during the battle to scare the Indian War Elephants and make them to fly away from the battle scene. War Elephants were the main Indian weapons and without them Mughals were in deep trouble. That’s why this tactic was implemented and these camels were called “Back Fired Camels”.


Nader Shah the Great of Iran Marble bust


Nader Shah the Great of Iran profile bust


Nader Shah the Great charges on
Nader Shah the Great Mausoleum and Museum Mashhad, Iran
Nader Leads the Charge
L – R: Nader Shah with battle axe (leads on the horse top), Bugler (Sheypurchi) blows battle bugle, Standard Bearer and Musketeer


Nader son of Khorasan
Nader Shah the Great Mausoleum and Museum Mashhad, Khorasan, Iran


Nader Shah the Great of Iran’s Zanburak (Mobile Cannon) at the Nader Mausoleum Mashhad, Iran


Nader Shah the Great’s Statue at the Nader Mausoleum and Museum Mashhad, Iran
L – R: Nader and the Bugler


Nader Shah on the horse top with the battle axe, charging and leading the troops


Nader Shah the Great


Afsharid Imperial Persian Colonial Cavalry Officer 18 AD


Afsharid Persian Armored Cavalry Officer 18 AD


Afsharid Persian Camel Cavalry 12 Striped Red and White Battle Standard Bearer


Afsharid Persian Camel Cavalry Mobile Artillery Officer 18 AD


Afsharid Persian Camel Cavalry Mobile Artillery Soldier (Zanburakchi) 18 AD

Naderi Zanburak
One of Nader’s superb military tactics was to put light artillery cannons (Zanburak in Persian) on camels’ backs and maneuver the camels in to logistically hard to position regular heavy artillery cannons. This way Zanburaks could be moved to mountain tops, desert hills, islands (via navy ships) and sea shores. These portable camel artillery units could be moved to impossible terrains.  This would give the Persian Cavalry the advantage to bombard the enemy from the above and around on various hard to reach land masses. These Camel Cavalry Mobile Artillery units were also very effective tools against the Indian War Elephant Units. These Mobile Artillery Cannons were known as the “Naderi Zanburak” (Zanburak of Nader).

Zanburak and Zanburakchi
Afsharid Imperial Persian Colonial Army Camel Cavalry Mobile Artillery cannons were called “Zanburak” and Cavalrymen who operated them were called “Zanburakchi”. Afsharid Mobile Artillerymen (Zanburakchi) were mighty fine shots.


Afsharid Persian Colonial Camel Cavalry Mobile Artillery Officer (with Command Axe) and Standard Bearer


Afsharid Persian Colonial Camel Cavalry Mobile Artillery Riders 18 AD


Afsharid Persian Colonial Camel Cavalry Mobile Artillery Regiment 18 AD


Afsharid Imperial Persian Colonial Army Artilleryman with Short Barrel Cannon 18 AD
Afsharid Army Artillerymen (Toopchi) were explosive experts and mighty great shots.

Toop and Toopchi
Afsharid Imperial Persian Colonial Army Heavy Artillery Cannons were called “Toop” and the Heavy Artillerymen were called “Toopchi”. Afsharid Toopchi were hell of a shots.


Afsharid Persian Colonial Army Musketeers Officer 18 AD
With Persian Curved Sword and Pistol (Gun Powder Bag)


Afsharid Persian Colonial Officer 18 AD
With Persian Curved Sword, Dagger and Axe


Afsharid Persian Musketeer 18 AD

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